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  1. Full details on the production version of Porsche's all-electric performance car So how much do you want to know about the real Mission E, the all-electric performance car that Porsche are bringing in to production in 2019. The details are interesting, the car looks fantastic, travels at ludicrous speed and provides some much needed competition to the Tesla cars. Design The 2019 Mission E will launch with a sports coupe style with a low and sleek profile, very similar to the first concept we saw in September 2015. There are some subtle changes though, namely the wide arches which is a shame but maybe to be expected. The car will use a slightly re-desinged version of the body shell from the Cross Turismo, albeit with a different roof and will ride much lower. Performance Mission-E will do 0-62mph in ‘less than 3.5 seconds’ and It’ll also get to 125mph in ‘less than’ 12 seconds and have a top speed of ‘more than’ 155mph says Porsche officially and we believe the 'less/more-than' is the important aspect of these claims phrase. We fully expect typical Porsche conservatism on the numbers here. These bonkers statistics are delivered by a pair of powerful motors, front and rear, totalling more than 600bhp. They’re the permanent magnet synchronous type, as used by Nissan and others. They’re more power-dense and temperature-stable than Tesla’s induction motors. To keep the acceleration strong all the way to top speed, two-speed gearboxes will be used. The 918 decouples its front motor at speed; it’s conceivable the Mission E will have a two-speed box at the back and a decoupling clutch at the front. It’s fundamentally a rear-biased car anyway, as the rear motor is more powerful than the front. Braking As you would expect of a Porsche the braking is going to be pack leading and Porsche confirms it will have computer ‘blended’ braking where the pedal is effectively a request for retardation rather than a mechanical link to the discs. A computer works out whether to get that retardation from the discs or the motors. Noise Ok, so following the 718 Cayman release we all know how emotional we can be with how a Porsche should sound. The Mission-E won’t sound like a flat 6 for obvious reasons. However Porsche R&D chief Michael Steiner says: “It needs to be low noise, but with more emotion. But not a false V8 or flat-six sound. We could synthesise that, but it would be silly. The sound will be linked to the technology.” Battery Charge & Range It takes just fifteen minutes to charge the Mission-E, from flat to 80%. By about 2020, there will be a network of EV chargers across continental Europe, no more than 75 miles apart. They also include a contactless payment system, so as soon as you drive up they’re ready to go. There are currently a plethora of different routes to charging your electric vehicle and different methods to pay and which will work and which won't. We expect a format war of sorts over the coming years and hopefully they will one day all accept the same USB plug Porsche claim the Mission-E will cover 500km on the NEDC cycle but expect a lot less in real world driving. This still falls short of the Tesla comparable models which is disappointing.
  2. Full details on the production version of Porsche's all-electric performance car So how much do you want to know about the real Mission E, the all-electric performance car that Porsche are bringing in to production in 2019. The details are interesting, the car looks fantastic, travels at ludicrous speed and provides some much needed competition to the Tesla cars. Design The 2019 Mission E will launch with a sports coupe style with a low and sleek profile, very similar to the first concept we saw in September 2015. There are some subtle changes though, namely the wide arches which is a shame but maybe to be expected. The car will use a slightly re-desinged version of the body shell from the Cross Turismo, albeit with a different roof and will ride much lower. Performance Mission-E will do 0-62mph in ‘less than 3.5 seconds’ and It’ll also get to 125mph in ‘less than’ 12 seconds and have a top speed of ‘more than’ 155mph says Porsche officially and we believe the 'less/more-than' is the important aspect of these claims phrase. We fully expect typical Porsche conservatism on the numbers here. These bonkers statistics are delivered by a pair of powerful motors, front and rear, totalling more than 600bhp. They’re the permanent magnet synchronous type, as used by Nissan and others. They’re more power-dense and temperature-stable than Tesla’s induction motors. To keep the acceleration strong all the way to top speed, two-speed gearboxes will be used. The 918 decouples its front motor at speed; it’s conceivable the Mission E will have a two-speed box at the back and a decoupling clutch at the front. It’s fundamentally a rear-biased car anyway, as the rear motor is more powerful than the front. Braking As you would expect of a Porsche the braking is going to be pack leading and Porsche confirms it will have computer ‘blended’ braking where the pedal is effectively a request for retardation rather than a mechanical link to the discs. A computer works out whether to get that retardation from the discs or the motors. Noise Ok, so following the 718 Cayman release we all know how emotional we can be with how a Porsche should sound. The Mission-E won’t sound like a flat 6 for obvious reasons. However Porsche R&D chief Michael Steiner says: “It needs to be low noise, but with more emotion. But not a false V8 or flat-six sound. We could synthesise that, but it would be silly. The sound will be linked to the technology.” Battery Charge & Range It takes just fifteen minutes to charge the Mission-E, from flat to 80%. By about 2020, there will be a network of EV chargers across continental Europe, no more than 75 miles apart. They also include a contactless payment system, so as soon as you drive up they’re ready to go. There are currently a plethora of different routes to charging your electric vehicle and different methods to pay and which will work and which won't. We expect a format war of sorts over the coming years and hopefully they will one day all accept the same USB plug Porsche claim the Mission-E will cover 500km on the NEDC cycle but expect a lot less in real world driving. This still falls short of the Tesla comparable models which is disappointing. View full record
  3. Works fine, you’re trying to embed the links David. User error See here: http://www.caymanoc.com/forums/topic/173-michelin-n0-marked-tyres/
  4. Looks ok to me, I don’t think many others have larger...?
  5. Porsche must have gotten it wrong, I swear they are releasing their most ‘driver focussed’ vehicles as manuals these days... Too bad for those lap times eh
  6. The dealer should sell you the bolts at the parts desk for a few quid. The job is an absolute pig to do though even with the right air/power tools.
  7. 987 is the Cayman and Boxster post 2005 986 was the original Boxster
  8. You only need to change it once on a M96 engine. It’s not really an issue on the M97 engine. Not a choice you’d have to make for a Cayman mind...
  9. We can bring it back... Didnt want too much clutter on the front page, but if the consensus says it worked then i’m happy to
  10. Be interesting to see what you end up with following a tune. I have to say, any decent Porsche tuner worth their salt will certainly recommend changing the exhaust on these cars before mapping particularly if you've spent all that money on the inlet side, if they don't they just want your cash. Which exhausts have you tried that drone?
  11. Geek is top tier - it's a good thing, it means you've reached 20 'likes', the varying degrees of reputation are; 20 - Geek 10 - Good 0 - Neutral -10 Poor -20 Piss Poor The forum ranks based on your number of posts are different; Newbie Member Established Member Senior Member Cayman Master
  12. That's bad luck! Glad you weren't too stranded though. I'm sure other forum members will have a bit more to add on the replacement part though
  13. Porsche Cayman GT4 with Fabspeed Race Headers Screams Out a Memorable Drive TIP? 23 March 2017, 22:10 GMT · BY ANDREI TUTU Not all that many people feel the need to improve a Porsche Cayman GT4, but, for those who don't belong in this category, it's reassuring to know that the aftermarket offers tons of solutions. The majority of GT4s drivers who take their Porschas down the tuning route do it for aural reasons and one of the most vicious-sounding setups out there comes from Fabspeed Motorsport. The Pennsylvania-based developer offers multiple exhaust setups for the Neunelfer-engined Cayman and we're here to talk about the most extreme. This features a set of race headers, along with a vavletronic exhaust and we'll start with the first piece of hardware. The catless long tube headers mean this setup is destined for play outside public roads. The goodie also works as a brief trip to the gym, for instance delivering up to 18 hp and 15 lb-ft of twist at 6,300 rpm. as for the low-end gains, the most impressive values come at 3,700 rpm, adding 27 hp and 38 lb-ft of torque - note that all these values are measured at the wheels, so they're between 10 and 15 percent greater than the crank horsepower numbers that are usually used to describe outputs. On the weight reduction from, the custom setup is 10 lbs friendlier to the scale than the one it replaces and this is also a good moment to mention that the system is built of stainless steel. All the tech details mentioend above are fine, but there's nothing like real-world experience to showcase the sharper attitude of the Porsche Cayman GT4 mentioned here. And that's exactly what you'll find in the piece of footage below. This clip delivers a sweet GT4 drive, albeit one that takes place on the street. However, note that the valvetronic muffler means that, at the touch of the button, the driver can make this mid-engined Porsche less of a screamer.
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