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Cayman R Suspension Refresh - ARB first


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Getting some noise from the R (57k miles) front end over slow bumps and rougher roads.

 

Will do the ARB bushes and drop links first.

 

I know the R has a larger rear diameter ARB than the S. I will check OPC pricing but Autodoc has good stock/pricing - they bring up a 21mm Meyle rear one for the R. Does that look right?

 

Who makes the bushes and drop links  for Porsche - TRW?

 

Here's autodoc Meyle options...

 

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I wouldn't worry about buying OEM drop links. Meyle HD are fine are about £15 a side on ebay.

 

In terms of the ARB bushes, I'd just order them from an OPC or go Powerflex if you really want.

 

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Issue now is will the drop links come out of wheel hub upright easily.  I hear galvanic corrosion can lock them in...

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I've replaced loads now on boxster and caymans and have never had an issue so you may get lucky. 

 

I also have an induction heater though so seized bolts aren't usually too troublesome

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19 minutes ago, Lennym1984 said:

I've replaced loads now on boxster and caymans and have never had an issue so you may get lucky. 

 

I also have an induction heater though so seized bolts aren't usually too troublesome

 

My car is actually pretty clean in the wheel wells in terms of rust etc so here's hoping

I've heard about those induction heaters.  Clever!

 

 

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I have just got full set of drop links Meyle HD off Ebay and quality looks excellent, they are very good German made I have used there stuff before. However the corrosion has slowed down progress dramatically, managed to get a front one free, but rears are going to be difficult due to access for HAMMER and heat.

Hopefully they will stop the rattles at the front which I was told was normal by a reputable non Porsche service garage, I guess he knew what it was and the trouble they are to replace.

I hadnt considered replacing anti roll bar rubbers though? any thoughts?

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Meyle are really decent quality in my experience, have used their parts on a few of my Porsches over the years and never had a problem with them.  
 

For the cost involved and whilst you’re under the car I’d definitely replace the ARB rubber bushes as it’s the easiest part to replace too.  I would go with OEM personally rather than a poly bush if you’re using it mainly on the road.  I found that poly arb bushes just introduce more road noise and vibrations for very little in the way of benefit. 
 

The top bolt on the drop links is normally the one that causes issues, can be a real bugger to drive it out.  But, heat and a hammer is the way to do it...and persistence.  It is galvanic corrosion that gets it stuck, rather than rust per se.  

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FYI when I had rattling at the front, it was the tuning fork joint at the front, it's bolted up near the ARB bush and then diagonally back onto the hub.

I replaced with meyle tuning forks, maybe £100 each iirc with 2 years warranty.

The ARB bushes didn't look worn, or the drop links. 

This was at 56k miles on a 2009 2.9 Gen2.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, GlosRich said:

FYI when I had rattling at the front, it was the tuning fork joint at the front, it's bolted up near the ARB bush and then diagonally back onto the hub.

I replaced with meyle tuning forks, maybe £100 each iirc with 2 years warranty.

The ARB bushes didn't look worn, or the drop links. 

This was at 56k miles on a 2009 2.9 Gen2.

 

Yes, seems to be a few different things can cause it. I've got front up on stands with with both wheels off tonight. Tomorrow, I'll give the control arms (tuning forks) a good thump with mallet ...was concentrating on drop rods tonight which appear nice and tight. The front right noise has been getting worse and I was sure I'd be able to find it compared to winter when I last looked. I was comparing the left (good) and bad (right) sides

 

Thing is it appears to be linked to understeer coming into left hand turns. That's getting worse and so has the noise. I'd expected to find the ARB drop rods as being the cause but nothing obvious from digging tonight. I've got new ones coming. Tie rods and control arms too.

 

Will get onto Frazer part about Coffin arms. They are good on price but no stock ...

 

Also, looking tonight I was worried that I wouldn't able to get torque wrench onto two of the coffin arm bolts but I've found this clever thing.

https://www.motionpro.com/a/adjustable-torque-wrench-adapter-08-0380/

 

 

Edited by Andyoz
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Worth checking for play in the top mounts too, they can cause a knocking/rattling noise...

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10 minutes ago, Beanoir™ said:

Worth checking for play in the top mounts too, they can cause a knocking/rattling noise...

 

Yes, I've read that. How do I check for play as I've had a good look from the wheel arch.. Do I need to get body trim off and go from above?

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I just gig confirm thaty Autodoc order has shipped. It includes 20% Vat... hopefully it doesn't get funky at Customs.

 

I did read Autodoc sometimes tries to substitute other brands to what you've ordered. I've got screen grabs of Live Chat where they confirmed they won't do that - if they do it's going back at their cost.

 

I just noticed they now have Meyle front Coffin arms in stock. All their prices are really keen. They also have TRW rear control arms (actual Porsche manufacturer).  From my research it looks like its only the inner/outer tie rods and rear control arms that seem to be available from TRW so I'm grabbing them while they're available...

 

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Edited by Andyoz
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I've always found it difficult to diagnose play in either the drop links or tuning forks when on the car. Once off it its reasonably obvious for the drop links but for the tuning forks, you need to clamp them in a vice in order to feel the minescule amount of play. 

 

If it's causing steering issues, would it be worth checking the tie rod ball joints? Unless the drop links were literally falling apart, I can't see them causing this

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13 minutes ago, Lennym1984 said:

I've always found it difficult to diagnose play in either the drop links or tuning forks when on the car. Once off it its reasonably obvious for the drop links but for the tuning forks, you need to clamp them in a vice in order to feel the minescule amount of play. 

 

If it's causing steering issues, would it be worth checking the tie rod ball joints? Unless the drop links were literally falling apart, I can't see them causing this

 

Yes, I have TRW inner and outer tie rods coming. Looks like a few tricks to get the inner ones on - special adaptor to allow you to torque it up. I'm an engineer and OCD on torque settings LOL.

 

I really need to get all the stuff on and get an alignment done. If I was back in Oz I wouldn't be worried about rust/galvanic rust but here if I start into this job and get just one component 'lock up' on me I'll be cursing why I didn't hand her to an indie. 

Edited by Andyoz
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53 minutes ago, Lennym1984 said:

If it's causing steering issues, would it be worth checking the tie rod ball joints? Unless the drop links were literally falling apart, I can't see them causing this

 

Yes, when I say steering issue, it's not that the steering feels bad it's just the car reacts differently on a left and right hand turn.  It's as though the right front isn't as 'stiff' and thought it could be traced back to the ARB.  I'm sure it way more complicated than that.  My issue is the two Indies I would use are 1.5hrs away and flat out so not a case of getting a quick opinion.

 

Either way I'm refreshing loads of parts as the component cost doesn't break the bank if you hussle and lots of it will be due soon anyway.  If it;s going to need doing then I may as well do it now and then I'll know I;m driving a nice tight one.  One reason I got the R is it's definitely not a car you begrudge spending money on as it gives it back to you in spades.

 

Lots spend as much on maintaining a Hyundai SUV at dealers...

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Just now, Andyoz said:

I really need to get all the stuff on and get an alignment done. If I was back in Oz I wouldn't be worried about rust/galvanic rust but here if I start into this job and get just one component 'lock up' on me I'll be cursing why I didn't hand her to an indie. 

 

Buy an induction heater! They are only about £200 these days and will get a bolt/nut glowing hot in about 15 seconds.

 

Also, with the exception of the drop link, most of the other bolts can be cut off if the worst comes to the worst. Loads of people use a reciprocating saw but I found it easy to do with one of these (time consuming yes but little risk of accidentally cutting through the subframe).

 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/irwin-24tpi-metal-plastic-mini-hacksaw-10-250mm/99650

 

I completely rebuilt the suspension (every single component) on my Cayman and the only seized bolts I had were one front coffin arm, one rear coffin arm, and a toe link. I didn't use the induction heater on these as past experience told me that it would be easier/quicker to just reach straight for the saw.

 

The drop links all slid out but I gave them a little heat just in case.

 

On my old Boxster (which had the perfect combination of low miles and a large servce history!), I never encountered a seized bolt. As I say, you may be lucky.

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2 hours ago, Andyoz said:

 

Yes, I've read that. How do I check for play as I've had a good look from the wheel arch.. Do I need to get body trim off and go from above?


weight of the wheels, wiggle the spring and or damper and check for play basically.  Also, with the car stationary on the ground, turn the steering wheel lock to lock and listen and feel for any knocking or binding.  

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1 hour ago, Lennym1984 said:

 

Buy an induction heater! They are only about £200 these days and will get a bolt/nut glowing hot in about 15 seconds.

 

Also, with the exception of the drop link, most of the other bolts can be cut off if the worst comes to the worst. Loads of people use a reciprocating saw but I found it easy to do with one of these (time consuming yes but little risk of accidentally cutting through the subframe).

 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/irwin-24tpi-metal-plastic-mini-hacksaw-10-250mm/99650

 

I completely rebuilt the suspension (every single component) on my Cayman and the only seized bolts I had were one front coffin arm, one rear coffin arm, and a toe link. I didn't use the induction heater on these as past experience told me that it would be easier/quicker to just reach straight for the saw.

 

The drop links all slid out but I gave them a little heat just in case.

 

On my old Boxster (which had the perfect combination of low miles and a large servce history!), I never encountered a seized bolt. As I say, you may be lucky.

 

Ah man, you"re bringing my confidence back.  A mate showed me an induction heater 2 years ago and thought it was cool. It's really the last item I need in my armoury. I've geared up my home garage to do this stuff so may as well get one too. The hand hack saw looks good too. Time isn't critical for me anyway.

 

Really hard to get Indie to do things here with the Covid hangover. Also, don't want a rushed job by an overworked mechanic!!

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