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  1. Picked it up today, an absolutely fantastic drive of about 70 miles to get it home. I know this won't be news to you all but I've never driven a more solid or planted car, just awesome, very happy.
    4 points
  2. You have the warranty for what it’s worth included for 6 months, that’s a decent enough time for you to go over what is an 11 year old car. Go through the forum and find out what others have replaced, not everyone, and not every item may occur but they include: Moll batteries, leaking hose joints, corroded radiators and a/c condensers, gear change cables, auxiliary belt hardware. Whilst the salesman might verbally say the replacement of any of the above is covered: he is not the warrantee insurance company and is unlikely to have the authority to commit them to anything if you tried putting in writing. For real peace of mind, have enough spare pounds to cover replacement costs yourself.
    3 points
  3. LOL. Yep - not my first Black car - used to have an Alfa 159. Seems to be a dark theme to my cars..
    3 points
  4. This may be of help to someone - one other job I got round too recently was replacing one of the grommets which had come out of its hole in the sill (I presume these holes are as a result of the manufacturing process?). The grommet had kind of disintegrated over time. So I measured up and bought some 20mm closed grommets from screwfix https://www.screwfix.com/p/schneider-electric-closed-grommet-20mm-100-pack/18603 And they fitted perfectly. The other sill grommets are still in place but some are looking a little worse for wear - mind you I have 99 left so shouldn't have to worry!
    3 points
  5. Absolutely do not use Design911. You'll pay a huge premium for very basic/common parts. I'd shop around - Oil from Opie (maybe the filter too - it will come with the rubber washer) and eBay/ECP/BuyCarParts etc for the rest. You don't need a new drain plug (unless the old one has been destroyed) - you just need the crush washer (I can't remember the size off the top of my head but you should be able to google it). As for the filter removal tool... take your pick but I think I got mine from Amazon (they're not particularly specialised).
    2 points
  6. The orange one on C&C at the moment was on Autotrader last month. I viewed it at the end of October, but ended up buying the other orange one that was on Autotrader (I know - two orange S Sports for sale at the same time!). I’m surprised to see this is still for sale. After I passed up on it, the seller said he had another interested buyer, and told me was sold. Maybe the sale fell through? It’s a nice car. It has Bose and heated seats in addition to the usual S-Sport stuff. There is a mark on the drivers seat base. Looks like a liquid spill. Maybe it’d clean up ok, or maybe it would be a costly re-trim? Other than that, it just looked like it needed a good detail. Number plate, leaves in the grills etc. If there were chips on the bonnet/wings they were tiny. The car drove lovely and had good service history from OPC and a specialist. No visible smoke from exhaust on cold start up (no more than normal), and no tapping noises from engine. Without a car lift, it’s not possible for me to say how things looked underneath. This will make a nice car for someone. The only reason I went with the other one, was because it was in A1 condition, and despite not having Bose or heated seats, I still had to pay more for it. It was tough to choose between them though.
    2 points
  7. Hi Cliff. We've spoken on PCGB. If you join the Cayman S Sport Owners Group on Facebook and search #green #uk you'll see that they know of only #408 (yours) and #413. Although the group has only accounted for around half the Sports sold, there is only one remaining in the UK according to DVLA and that includes SORN numbers. That last green one known to have sold in the UK was this one: https://www.revolution-porsche.co.uk/for-sale/porsche-cayman-s-sport-limited-edition-2009?fbclid=IwAR0k9x54PsNmkijHkYNL-aIP91VlMPYb7OgoAupLnr1ZjkIqcktXto8Rzmw. If that looks like yours maybe Revolution would give you something to follow up.
    2 points
  8. Aftermarket warranties are usually a waste of time. They sell "peace of mind" but rarely deliver when the need arises. You usually pay for diagnostics Then have to pay for disassembly and for them to validate the failure If the failure is covered, they absorb that disassembly cost But, if they remove something that needs replacing and it isn't covered by the warranty, you will have to pay to replace it Labour rates are usually limited and wouldn't cover most specialist rates If the warranty leaves you dry, you've paid more money for the warranty and will also pay outrageous parts costs from their approved garages. You can become alluded into the state of mind that "I have a warranty that covers xyz and it will get fixed for free if xyz fails" when the reality is quite different. Unless it's an OPC warranty (which you can buy, BTW) then I would be knocking that off the sale price of the vehicle instead.
    2 points
  9. I’ve never replaced a single damper. I thought it was normal practice to do them as pairs. If it were my money, I’d buy Bilstien. I know that the OEM ones for PASM equipped cars are definitely Bilstien.
    2 points
  10. Apologies for being quiet in recent weeks, but the good news is I put a deposit down today on a black gen 2, 2011. so happy, but wanted to thank everyone who has answered questions and given great advice. I finally made it. 😀
    2 points
  11. I don't think it's an S, just has an 'S' badge but is listed as a 2.9 and had black lower front bumper sections, not body coloured. Quite why anyone would do that I don't know, I actually think the straight 'Cayman' badge looks more elegant when not adorned with the big 'S' at the end!
    2 points
  12. I'm still lol-ing 10mins after seeing this. Some folk!! 🙄
    2 points
  13. After 1 week of ownership I’d found a lot of leaves and crap in the front by the condensers which took a while to clear out, I’ve had a first go at adding DIY mesh grills. Should see us through the winter then I think bumper off next year to do a more pro looking job. The £100+ cost of the bendy mesh seems a bit much so I gave it a go with 8mm semi rigid plastic mesh for <£10. Cardboard template then cut the mesh with scissors.. cable ties and job done. I found: 1) Smaller mesh would be better, but getting the zip ties in a smaller hole would be very fiddly. Bumper off with finer metal mesh is better in long term 2) The semi rigid plastic may not fully stop stones at 70mph! But will at least take some energy out of it and might save the condenser.. so best will be metal with bumper off install. It will stop leaves though. 3) Was expecting some rattle or noise with them on, can’t hear a thing. A couple of pics too.
    1 point
  14. Don't bother with the Kurust. The rust should be surface rust only so a good going over with a wire brush or a dremel grinding stone should get you back to clean shiny metal. Zinc primer and then a stone chip paint (I like Hammerite Stonechip Shield) should be sufficient. The Kurust will just create a weak surface for the paint to adhere to.
    1 point
  15. Great I have Cayman R mufflers on my S so potentially a different tone with the x-pipe on the fab Its being ordered and fitted next week along with a detailing and ceramic coat to wheels, paint with callipers being resprayed as previous owner must have put some chemical on as they bubbled
    1 point
  16. Hi all Just thought I'd share my experience of replacing the interior boot/bonnet release switch. My frunk switch stopped working the other day - the switch itself suddenly felt a bit loose, which I soon learnt was a common issue, where a small part of the internal plastic gubbins breaks, so a whole new switch is required. Searched on D911 etc and the part was coming up at around the £80 - £100 mark. But there are lots of sellers on eBay of what looks like the same part for around £20. So I decided to take a punt on the cheaper option, on the basis that if it was a cheap copy I'd send it back or just live with it till it breaks again (they are pretty easy to swap out). I have to say though that the item I was sent, I can barely tell the difference with the 'original' part. It might be a very good copy, or the same part from the same factory but missing out the middleman, but whatever, it fits and works perfectly. I got it from here: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bonnet-Boot-Release-Switch-99761310502-For-Porsche-911-987-997-Boxster-Cayman/174391810398?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649 Or there are lots of other sellers you can choose from. And I used this excellent guide on Rennlist to fit it: https://rennlist.com/forums/997-forum/893373-diy-for-replacing-the-trunk-engine-lid-switch.html Hope this helps someone!
    1 point
  17. Nice work! While you might've gotten away with a little smaller, larger mesh is probably good for the sake of airflow anyhow. My understanding is that, as you move to finer meshes, flow is affected non-linearly. Very fine meshes become barrier-like. I know people say it doesn't make a difference, but it empirically does - it's just not a huge problem in UK weather with street driving (even enthusiastic street driving). In my head, the mesh only needs to be sized to avoid anything particularly likely to cause damage: bigger pebbles/rocks. Suspect you'll get that effect out of this.
    1 point
  18. I was going to get the Cargraphic tail pipes on my R but was advised by the garage (a Cargraphic dealer) that the quality of the chrome was not that great, so I went for the black Techart ones instead and sold the originals via this site.
    1 point
  19. You've really got to find a like-minded soul to recoup your expenditure with something that modified.
    1 point
  20. Just to add, if you sign up to Opie you'll see that they offer discounts on an almost daily basis. Wait for a decent discount before ordering
    1 point
  21. If you haven't already, join the Sport Owners group on Facebook as members post links to models that they see come up for sale. There is an orange one on Car & Classic but I'm not sure how tidy it is; certainly there was another sold recently and the buyer had chosen it over the C&C one.
    1 point
  22. Yes, congrats @futureechos, really happy for you. Looks like a lovely one, I'm sure you will enjoy it!
    1 point
  23. @futureechos Near side intake is air induction for air filter & offside intake is for cooling of the engine bay. "De-Snorking" the nearside intake by removing the restriction plate allows for supposedly better induction flow... I've got my CS desnorked & it does increase the intake roar at higher rpm but I don't notice any improvement in power. Some folk remove the restriction plate and then fit a 3D printed type of plate (pointless imo)... I've never had any issue with debris/water ingress...
    1 point
  24. Good for you and well done in making that dream a reality. I’m sure you’ll love your new Porker 🤩👍🏻
    1 point
  25. I think I found him on Facebook along with a distant pic of what could be the car from 2018 but nothing more recent. Might be worth messaging him just to ask about it?
    1 point
  26. No worries Cliff - unfortunately my mates brother no longer has any contact details for the buyer of his car. 🙁 I’ve asked him to ask his brother if he can remember which number it was, will report back if he can remember.
    1 point
  27. I’d also suggest your spongy brakes may simply need fresh brake fluid, and a proper PIWIS activated brake bleed. what’s the mileage and how well documented is the service history? i had a dealer warranty for 12 months from Cridfords - nothing broke in that time. since then I’ve had all the usual stuff need changing on a 10+ year old 987; ie: cross over coolant pipes, coffin arms, battery, condensers, PSE actuator valves. None of it hugely expensive (if you use Indy’s) and some of it DIYable if youre capable with spanners and have time and space for the car to be off the road. it’s very unlikely you’ll have a major failure (engine / gearbox / main electronic control unit). I’d suggest budget for some replacements/repairs over the next 2-3 years and save that away as your contingency pot rather than spend out on a ‘mechanical breakdown insurance policy’ (it’s not really a warranty). If you don’t have any repair bills then you still have the pot of money at the end to put into your next car 😉👍🏻
    1 point
  28. A Porker owning friend of mines brother owned a viper green sport edition a couple of years ago. He sold it onto a guy called Daniel Pitchford in Cardiff. my friend was contacted by Tom from 911Virgin about his brothers car just this week, so I’m guessing all paths of enquiry are now converging (towards Mr Pitchford in Cardiff 😉) - good luck with your search 👍🏻
    1 point
  29. That's interesting. Certainly clarifies the DVLA info! Good luck with your search.
    1 point
  30. Had new Bilstein B6 dampers fitted with new standard springs to mine a couple of months ago, seem good so far. I brought the car originally with the Bilstein B12 coil over kit which was too hard for me personally on the road so the B6 is an improvement. Did consider the bog standard B4 but went for the sportier B6.
    1 point
  31. Don't replace a single one, always do them in pairs. If you had a new single one, it'll likely upset the handling and isn't something that would 'settle' as the old one wouldn't be a stiff.
    1 point
  32. Only a couple of pics, hope to pick up Saturday. 2011(61) 2.9L 61,000 miles FPSH Manual, Gloss Black Full Black Leather Interior 18" Boxster S II Alloy Wheels Porsche Communications Management with Satellite Navigation Module (Europe Package) Touchscreen Radio / Sat Nav, Bluetooth Connectivity ASK Sound System Upgrade Aux / USB / i-Pod Connectivity Rear Parking Sensors, 3 Spoke Sports Steering Wheel in Smooth Leather Heated Seats Non sports seats (which is what I preferred) 6 months warranty Only extra I really would have liked was the Bose, but you can't have everything... (not with my budget) If I really don't like the audio I can take a look at that later.. mostly engine noises for the first few months will be OK I expect.
    1 point
  33. I’m going for Carnewal, rather than have it posted and fitted here I thought it would be a good excuse to get the car used and have a couple of nights in Bruges too. Looking forward to it!
    1 point
  34. Cheers guys. I've got my eye on an Evora now, but haven't driven one yet. I'll go and test drive it this week, hopefully. If it pans out and they offer me close to 30 as a trade in, I'll probably take it. It's the usual dilemma of can't have both cars, but can't be without a car at all. I suppose I have the option of buying a temporary shed, selling the Cayman and be ready to pull the trigger when the right Evora comes along. First world problems eh?
    1 point
  35. I seem to recall that Bilstein is the OEM. I'd go for the pair, personally - I even considered an upgrade to the B6 (I believe B4 are standard), if you want the characteristics it brings.
    1 point
  36. The Porsche dampers are probably Bilstein manufactured. You won't go wrong.
    1 point
  37. Thankfully, my typo has been pointed out... I CAN'T own both at once.
    1 point
  38. If you'd seen the crash photos posted on PH of that Cat D one, you'd have been glad you missed out on buying it.
    1 point
  39. A lot of analysis on this car on the PH thread. Panel gap concerns and photos of the original damage suggest it is a god send that you missed out. Avoid at all costs was the consensus .
    1 point
  40. I know it is an outdated reply but for anyone who has a similar rattle. I thought I had a loose exhaust baffle and had it checked by an indy who, by pure luck as he was changing the temp sensor, found the belt tensioner loose and rattling. Apparently a known fault.
    1 point
  41. The top one looks surprisingly good. What wing is it?
    1 point
  42. I thought I’d start a build tread of my 987 S project track car as I’m on a 17 hour flight from hell and need to kill some time and might as well make use of the free wi-fi. My other reason for uploading this build thread is to maybe help a new Cayman owner who is thinking of blowing (investing) thousands into a track project. I’ve read so many detailed build stories and found them so helpful with my project, probably saving me ££££ and alerting me to all the issues and gimmicks to watch out for. So I think I should return the favour with this one as its fair to say it hasn’t been easy and I could tell some people put real effort into their build threads. Chapter 1 Porsche day: I bought a completely stock 06 987 S from my local garage, so local in fact I live opposite the garage and drove passed it everyday on the way to work and it always caught my eye. I part exchanged my Megane RS250 coughed up some cash and voila… became a 24 year old Porsche owner. My goal for this car was to be an all out track car, a kind of 987 GT3/4 partly inspired by the Cayman Interseries GTB1 cars raced in the US. So after researching how to start I did the usual reading and straight away went about protecting that troublesome (time bomb) of an engine with a Porsche motorsport baffled oil sump to stop any major oil starvation, a known problem for the 3.4 987. Chapter 2 Brakes: Next wanted to improve that horrible stock brake feel and spoke to Ryan Stewart (Blue Bilstein Cayman), who showed me all the work he did to his Cayman. This was very helpful so I installed the 997 GT3 brake master cylinder and GT3/GT2 brake cooling ducts. A pretty cheap and easy mod that makes a big difference. First major problem: An eroded left brake calliper that spewed brake fluid out of the bleed nipple and needed replacing. With a lead time of 4 months for a new one and £550+ we proceeded to drill out the eroded side, make a new thread and bleed nipple. It took months but works fine and saved a few quid. Chapter 3 Exhaust: A few track days in and I’m loving the car and start going for a new exhaust and made a big mistake. I wanted to remove the massive secondary cats and went for a cheap exhaust as it sounded good, looked good and I read a few good reviews. Apparently not, it is way too loud, 104db (black flagged everywhere), boomy and wasn’t even installed correctly. I won’t name the garage, but with their large social media following and reputation it was a big disappointment. Now the exhaust needs these ugly baffles in order to pass the noise test. It will be replaced soon. Chapter 4 Aero (ish): Next was aero, strange decision and in hindsight probably should have done everything else first. So I got a GT4 rear wing and lower front lip to improve the looks and add downforce. It caused a noticeable difference on the track and needed some additional Joe Toth canards to stop it going light at the front at highs speeds. On the roads you can’t ever feel it, but at Castle Combe you can as the first corner is flat approaching 130mph. Chapter 5 Power: IPD throttle body and GT3 plenum, a must have for improving throttle response and adding around 15bhp. That with the exhaust and then an ECU remap/air filter from Parr Motorsport completely changed the throttle characteristics. Revving much faster from 4.5k, keeping the engine always on the sports cam on track and making heel and toe much nicer, it also sounds a bit angrier. Chapter 6 Bucket Seats: The car was now pretty dam quick and the stock seats were no longer supportive. I wanted to use more Porsche GT parts and bought 997 GT3 RS fixed carbon alcantara buckets seats. Yep, these are the dogs Testicals, only 8KG each and weighing less than 1 stock seat. To go with the seats I got some Sabelt racing harnesses and the RSS harness bar. (Tip) any larger gentlemen or ladies thinking of these seats, beware they are snug, very snug. I’m short with a 30” waist and they are tight on me so… Chapter 7 Steering Wheel: I hate the stock Cayman wheel, I find it way too thin and not ideal for the track, so again went searching for Porsche GT options and wanted the Momo Cayman GT4 Clubsport one, but couldn’t get the exact one so got this one that’s near identical in size. It also has a horn so is road legal. Chapter 8 Vanity: I installed another official Porsche part, the 911 GT3 front smile grill. Why? Well because I like the look of it, it fits and importantly by cutting a small hole in the front bumper it actually lets out high-pressure air. I did this with the aim of reducing any front lift caused by the big GT4 wing, but cutting up your pride an joy Porsche wasn’t easy and its fair to say – I cocked up. It isn’t high enough on the bumper an annoys me every time I see it. Martini Wrap: I wanted to make the car look a bit like one of my favourite race cars of all time. A 1970s Porsche 911 RSR with Martini livery. It was quite helpful that Porsche also reintroduced the livery again on the new 911 GT3RS, so I gave the design to Edd at Wrap UK and he created it. He also wrapped the rear wing and front splitter to perfectly match the artic silver paint Chapter 9: Wheels and tyres: BBS split rims were out of budget so I went with Team Dynamics 18” Pro Race. Why? If its good enough for the BTCC… also I like the look, they’re supposed to be light weight and strong. They were much heavier than advertised on their website which was somewhat misleading. Wrapped in Toyo R888s, 245 front 275 rears. They’re amazing tyres, so much grip and as the picture shows way too much grip for the stock suspension to handle. Also only a Muppet would use R888s on stock suspension with no negative camber. Chapter 10, 11, 12 Suspension: You may think why haven’t you done the suspension yet? Well this was the most expensive and important modification and I really gave it some thought. So I did more research some serious saving and spoke to Bilstein and KW and other Cayman owners to look at the pros and cons. I had narrowed down Bilstein PSS9 or KW Variant 3s maybe Clubsports, wallet depending. Bilstein were no help at all, they gave no advice on which version is best for the Cayman, what the pros and cons were, where to go for installation or anything. KW on the other hand were great, spent a good 45 mins talking through my tyre setup, wheel size, which tracks I go to, what the cars current ride height was, how confident I felt with the car, what else in the suspension I was going to change and how much camber I intended to use. So I took a deep breath and went with KW Clubsports, Porsche 911 (996) Cup car adjustable lower control arms, H&R 997 GT3 RS anti-roll bars and new toe links. This would give me fully adjustable camber, anti-roll, geometry as well as ride height and damping etc… (TIP) The rear 987 control arms are adjustable and can in theory give 3 degrees of camber so you don’t need to replace them and could save £££. For the winter build I planned to do all the suspension installation with my dad in his garage. This was quite difficult without a lift system and it was essential that we did the work ourselves as we found a whole range of serious problems. First problem: the front anti-roll bar bushing was destroyed, no biggie. Second problem: getting the old suspension off. The front, not so bad, the rear, big problem. The left rear control arm joint had seized inside the wheel hub. When I mean seized I really mean seized. So had to cut the control arm off and lost an entire wheel hub, wheel bearing, left drive shaft and even the handbrake cable! This was not cheap and took around 6 weeks to arrive from the US. Luckily Porsche being Porsche once you know the part number you can find the same parts on the 997 and 987 cars so lots of available parts. Third problem: Spacers for the new front control arm, if you put the GT3 cup car motorsport control arms on the Cayman they fit perfectly, but require spacer nuts for the toe arm. Fourth problem: wheel clearance, the wider track wheels hit the suspension so required large spacers. This meant the rears were going to now rub the wheel arches. Fifth problem: The car wouldn’t start properly; we disconnected the battery over the winter for obvious reasons and it was showing engine warning lights, a lot of smoke and spluttering. Fixing the car: So the car now needed geometry, alignment and a proper track set up by the guys a Parr Motorsport. So I drove the car with our homemade alignment to Parr and is stared snowing, this was absolutely terrifying. I can’t give Parr any higher praise; they really know everything Porsche and had build a Cayman with exactly the same suspension, wheels and tyres as mine before so they did a modest track setup. Partly because of a very steep driveway at home and didn’t want to rip the front splitter off and because this was the first time driving the car in months with completely different suspension and I didn’t wan to dive in headfirst and bin it. They also fixed the engine, it was a broken solanoid senor that was causing a misfire on the left bank. If you’re still reading this then bravo you’re committed! Apologies if it’s rambling on, I still have 14 hours of my flight left and have turned to the Johnnie Walker to help pass the time. Got to love EVA Air, serving the good stuff! Chapter 13 Test day: I was so inpatient to drive the car again I booked a track day at Brands Hatch and it was -1C. So cold and icy it would be impossible to actually test the suspension and would be a waste of a day. I was half right. I did a sighting lap and thought this feels dangerous, so let my old man take the wheel and go out first. He used to race cars and grew up near Brands so he’s probably the faster driver. He spun on the first lap and tore the splitter clean off and sent us spinning into the grass. The problem became obvious, the rear H&R anti-roll bar was so stiff the car simply wouldn’t transfer its weight, couldn’t get any power down and was so twitchy and unstable. Imagine the disappointment, months or hard work, a lot of money spent and a slightly damaged undriveable car. We were suspicious that the rear anti-roll bar was too stiff from the start and we were correct. So a dilemma, what now? New anti-roll bar from Tarrot or use the old one. Well the old one was there and free so gave that ago at Brands hatch again. Perfect! Completely different, still a cold day, but the car felt amazing and much quicker than it was before even when I drove it on the same tyres in the summer. Chapter 14 Suspension set up fiddling: This is now where things are getting fun and fast. The KW Clubsports were still on the softest setting (still bloody stiff, not for the street) and felt great, absolutely zero understeer. The Cayman is naturally setup to understeer, mainly for daily drivability, safety and so it was never going to be faster than the 911. So with a mid engine balance, pretty big front and rear camber and a slight ride height rake angle with stiffer front anti-roll, the end result – Zero understeer. This is Parrs own setup and is a result of years of Porsche Cup Car Championship experience and building cayman race/track cars. Even in the winter with temperatures at 5C the car is comfortably around 3 seconds a lap faster than before around Brands hatches Indy, which is the shortest track in the UK. Chapter 15 Braking Again: Well it is the most important part of a track car. To compliment the new suspension I splashed out of PFC brake pads. They’re insanely expensive, but amazing. I used EBC race brake pads before and they were shite, one set lasted just one track day at Castle Combe, is that eligible for a refund? After the day at Brands Hatch I felt the brake pedal go long at the end of the pit straight. This was a bottom clenching experience to say the least. The reason was boiled brake fluid, although the GT3 brake master cylinder helps with brake fade and the larger GT3 brake cooling ducts help cool the brakes, the fluid was normal Mobil 1 not motorsport high temp race fluid. So I ordered some Motul high temperature fluid that has a boiling point of 300+C. Chapter something: The new Cayman R front spoilers have arrived and look great and much better than the aftermarket splitter I previously had that wasn’t driveway or curb friendly. So now the car is a cocktail of Cayman R, Cayman GT4, 911 GT3RS and 996 GT3 Cup Car parts. What is next? 911 GT3RS short shift is on order to replace that horrible long throw of the stock 987. If money was no option I would get the CAE short shift, but I heard that you should really upgrade to a lighter single mass flywheel and new clutch when making this change. Last week my daily Jaguar got written off thanks to the bonnet flipping up and smashing the windscreen and leaving me driving blind on the M27 into a layby. I probably will need to prioritise getting some boring replacement for my daily wheels. On a serious note a pothole in the outside lane of the M27 should not be so big it causes the bonnet latch to fail, puncture a tyre and nearly cause a fatal accident. Anyone from around Portsmouth, Emsworth or Chichester will know the road I mean. There is a hero lorry driver out there that saw me driving blind trying to see under the gap of the up turned bonnet and braked to let me in the lay by. (Rant over) So build not complete yet, maybe it never will be. But I think I’ve got a lot done in just a year and a bit, so I’m probably going to pace myself for the next year, although roll cage and new exhaust are calling. This car probably isn’t to everybody’s taste; in fact I know a lot of Porsche purists (snobs) will hate it, but I couldn’t care less. Recently drove passed a bloke in a beautiful black 964 and saw him shaking his head with disgust. Still didn’t wipe the smile off my face! If you have read all of this then cheers, any Cayman questions or advice please chip in. Now to test the quality of this EVA Air wi-fi and upload this mother. Still got another 11 hours flight so probably going to sink a few more Johnnie Walkers.
    1 point
  43. Having done this I can agree with all the comments. The only thing I will add is that it's worth buying all of the pipes for the front end before you start the job and return any you don't use afterwards. It's a pig of a job and I've no clue how it could be done without dropping the subframe. Having said that, if you lower the subframe on the bolts but don't remove them then I'm not sure why everyone says that you need to get it aligned afterwards as nothing is moved out of alignment. As it happens I did get an alignment check done a few months later and everything was fine at the front, furthering the notion that nothing had moved.
    1 point
  44. Sorry as this comes a bit later than promised but I just picked the car up from the garage today. As a reminder mine is a Gen 2 S with PASM, and I’ve just had the H&R 35mm springs installed. I’ve only driven about 15 miles and haven’t had the alignment done yet, so this is a really early view and a very positive one. My concerns were: a) would the drop in height be too much, and b) would it compromise the ride too much. Height/drop I’ve measured the drop and its 20mm front and 25mm back back. I’m gutted that I didn’t take a side profile pic before they were fitted so I could have the same profile pic after, but in my opinion it now sits just how it should have from the factory. It may settle a little more, and I think it might. If it does, I’m happy, if it doesn’t I’m still happy. Ride It’s excellent. Yes it is firmer, but that’s to be expected. Is it teeth chattering and bone crunching - not at all. The PASM is still working as it should, with a very noticeable Difference when switching between PASM normal, and PASM sport. Smaller bumps, cat eyes uneven manhole covers are all soaked up nicely. I’m not feeling like I’m going to be scanning every molecule of the road surface though. It also still gets up my drive (helpful!) 🙂 Time taken on the job Given its a pretty low mileage it had never come apart underneath, so as expected seized bolts a plenty. That meant new drop links all round which upped the budget a fair amount, but I’m quite happy to replace some of those old parts anyway. I’m away for a couple of weeks which leaves me bereft and without my new toy! I will report back in a few weeks once she’s settled providing updated measurements, associated pics, and update on driving characteristics. So far so good though! Pics below - quarter shots are from the dealer pre upgrade. Side profile is after the drop - Day 1 though so may move.
    1 point
  45. Hi, and welcome! You've opened Pandora's Box here , so belt in and hang on for the ride! I'll give my 2 bobs worth based on going through a similar process myself about 18 mths ago (note I'm less familiar with the gen 2 line up). In no particular order: - Purpose: think long and hard about what you're planning to used the car primarily for (and how long you might want to keep it)....e.g. a track day focus will delivery a different purchase to a Daily Driver requirement - Investment; personally, I'd say park that concept, and go for the best car you can afford (condition, history, PPI etc) that puts a smile on your face and you enjoy driving....if you want an investment, buy a 959 :-). IAnecdotally, 've had my gen 1 CS for 18 mths now, and it's worth roughly the same as what I paid for it. There are opinions aplenty re which model will have future growth potential....I personally think it's way too early to tell, but a 3.4 in theory might have an edge. - Budget; yours is healthy and as you say puts you into either a fine , late edition gen 1 CS with under 50K miles, or a fine early gen 2 Cayman (2.9l) , both with a nice smattering of options (circa 2007-2009 bandwidth). Go out and drive both models and lots of them (I test drove 13 or 14 cars , mix of Caymans and Boxters, before buying....gives you perspective on what a "good car" looks and feels like, as well as "bad" examples). You'll probably have cash left over if you purchase privately, conversely you might like the idea of paying more to a dealer and bagging a warranty or similar. - Horror Stories: you'll have read reams of blurb about IMS and bore scoring....to put it in perspective, combining both issues together, it affected something like 4-6% of cars I believe from 05-07 ish ( IMS was sorted in cars from 07/57 reg or thereabouts I believe). A pre purchase inspection (PPI) should include a bore scope to reduces the risk as any early signs should be detectable....but as with most things in life, nothing is 100% guaranteed. And rumour has is a very small % of the gen 2 DFI engines have suffered some issues too. - 2.7 V 3.4l: I've only test driven 2.7l Boxsters; they put a smile on my face, lovely sound, and in some ways you'll use more of the performance, more of the time compared to the 3.4. The smaller lump seems to be much less prone to scoring too (bearing in mind it's a small % to start with), but not necessarily less fun. Go and drive some, make your own comparison. Small hp difference b/w the 2.9 and 3.4 obviously, I've not compared the 2 myself. - Auto box Gen 1; personally , I wasn't not a fan (unless you plan to spend most of your time pootling in traffic), 6 speed is a a fangreat box. Gen 2 PDK is lightyears ahead of the 5 speeder. - Mileage: good question....higher mileage can mean good value for money IF miles racked up were via longer trips (not short stop start efforts ...the rev history/engine time logs can shed some light on this), maintenance has been regular (ie not just once every 2yrs/20K miles), consumables you'd expect to be replaced, have been replaced (clutch, brakes etc). If you're buying for investment (refer my earlier opinion). you'd be looking at the lowest mileage possible. Problem is. cars that are not used regularly, exercised properly, are only driven to church on Sundays (you get the ideal here....)....these garage queens can prove as problematic as a high miler that's been abused/not looked after. Trust the above hasn't put you to sleep! Seriously, don't lose too much sleep over this; test drive a lot of cars (in itself quite a nice way to spend time), be clear about what you're after and why, don't get hung up on a specific colour/options etc (unless you are happy to wait around for that Unicorn to arrive)...buy based on the condition, history, and of course have the car checked out professionally. Then do like the rest of us do, and enjoy our cars as regularly as possible...the cars are made to be driven. Good luck with the test drives.
    1 point
  46. Manning are no longer doing track day included in road side. Explained that 4 large payouts. Bringing out a new track day insurance in Dec
    0 points
  47. who knew 🤫 ... https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202111069308855
    0 points


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