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The Doc

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The Doc last won the day on September 23 2020

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  1. There will be many eyes rolling at the title I'm sure and much has been written on many an internet forum on the topic of N-rated tyres. But I'm not here to enter the murky depths of whether an N-rated tyre has a different rubber compound to it's non-rated equivalent, nor am I going to make any claims as to the performance differences and whether by not using N-rated tyres you will find yourself in a ditch one day. Today, I'm focussing on something more specific, and answering the question "Do insurance companies require you to fit N-rated tyres on your Porsche?" We spoke to a number of UK car insurance companies on this matter, some were less informed on the topic and some had obviously heard the question before, but the answer from all of those we questioned was the same - No, there is no requirement within our policy conditions that you fit N-rated tyres to your Porsche. The result of our conversations with the insurance companies and reading the small print on policies provided to Porsche owners, it was clear that the requirement to fit OE approved tyres as replacement to satisfy insurance policy conditions is certainly not common, in fact we couldn't find an insurer that did require it. There are however requirements to ensure that the correct tyre size and speed ratings are maintained, although this is still not that common to see it's certainly something that would be recommended for wider safety and performance of your car. That said, if a car insurer does require you to use OEM parts as a policy condition, firstly this doesn't usually refer to tyres, and if it did it is very unusual, even in the context of ultra high performance cars, such as a 918 for instance. But if it is there, you should check exactly what that means with the insurer before taking out the policy, because strictly speaking OEM refers to using the same brand of replacement parts. If your car insurance company insists on you using OE approved tyres as part of your policy conditions, then this is not such a grey area and would suggest that you should be fitting N-rated tyres to your car to ensure you are satisfying the conditions of your policy. However, we are not aware of any instance of this being the case, certainly not in the UK.
  2. I suppose it's no surprise that like many a petrolhead, spending time cruising the classifieds is not a strange habit. It could be likened in fact to a lady window shopping in her local designer outlet village and coming home with nothing but a receipt from Pret a Manger. When you spend that much time hanging out in the classifieds and coupled with a bit of talk among those in the trade you start to gauge a picture. So understanding the dynamics of used Porsche prices at the current time is not hard, but it does require some clear thinking and a bit of honesty if you are to judge the right price for a potential purchase. Just like me, you will probably also see a variety of posts on social media from folk wondering why their pride and joy hasn't sold even when advertised at 'below market price' and acting quite bewildered by this situation. Often this belief is supported and upheld by their fraternity, reaction is often a cocktail of denial and head scratching. But were somebody to suggest that said advertised car might be priced a bit punchy, you will literally be marched to Tyburn for suggesting such an outrageous idea. There is truth though, and it's cold and it's hard. The recent announcement of the 718 GT4 is not news, we all knew it was coming and sure enough it's nearly arrived. The good news is, it's faster, it's manual, it's got a flat-six naturally aspirated engine and it will be better than the 981 GT4. All very obvious when you say it out loud. The RRP is also £75k, add a few options and yes, it's likely to be just over £80k. What does this mean for the 981 GT4, the car thats market value went ridiculously through the roof, to the point that people were paying well over £100k for 'the best specced versions' back in 2016. Many of these cars are now fetching sub-£80k and falling still. We are now increasingly seeing 981 GT4s on the market for less than £70k and auction prices looking a fair bit lower, in fact bid prices are often not reaching the perceived market price. So what I hear you say.. Well, we've established that you can buy a very low mileage (sub 15k miles) 981 GT4 with a good spec for around £68k. Theres one or two in the classifieds and more to be had at auction. This represents sensible money for a 981 GT4, but there's probably a little more to go before the year is out, we'll see low £60k i'm sure. This invariably has a knock on affect and on to a car that I hold dear, one which i've always said is a better car in many ways than its bigger brother GT4, the Cayman R. Legendary for its simplistic and purist driver focussed approach, no frills but useable, limited but not exclusive. Porsche nailed it with this car, and we all know it. So the Cayman R was a bargain at £45k at a time when a used 981 GT4 was £100k+, 80% of the car for 50% of the cost, what's not to like. We were literally snapping them up all day long, they were selling over the phone at reputable dealerships provided they were endowed with those 3 most critical items - bucket seats, manual gearbox and spyder wheels. Any other options were nice, but certainly not required to deliver that legendary Cayman R experience. A Cayman R with those key options and a decent history should be fetching in the early £40k bracket, slightly down on 2016 prices but not by much. If however you are sitting on a car wit no bucket seats, PDK and above average mileage then you probably won't see north of £35k as a private sale in 2019. Now thats a bitter pill to swallow because back in 2016 even these cars were fetching mid-£40k at dealers amid the frenzy. There is currently a less-desirably specced (PDK, no buckets, higher than average miles) black Cayman R on eBay for £35,995 and has been hanging around for a while, it's unfortunately specced and still isn't selling at this price even though it apparently has OPC warranty and FPSH. The market has certainly toughened. So there it is, current pricing of some of the halo Cayman models are taking a bit of a hit brought on by the arrival of the new kid in town and maybe some nervousness more generally in the premium segment of the market. Hagerty have been reporting a decline in auction bid prices for Porsches for a while and the bubble that we've all been talking about is showing signs of deflating further. All this and I haven't even mentioned Brexit. What does this mean for a potential buyer of either of these models though, well the world is your oyster. A Cayman R for c.£35k is possible or even a low mileage 981 GT4 for mid £60s - a good time to buy compared to 18 months ago, or should you stay resolute and hold out a bit longer to see where the market goes...
  3. Well the rumours are becoming more beefed up in regard to the possibility of the Cayman T arriving and following in the footsteps of it's larger brother, the Carrera T. It could also go someway towards bringing back some of what Porsche gave us with the 987 Cayman R and have never really delivered on again either with the 981 or 718, the GTS being a bit soft and the GT4 being a bit, well GT. Our favorite mid-engined coupe from Stuttgart will be going under the knife and and our sources suggest that the Cayman T will be losing c. 30kg over the standard 718 and gaining 10-20hp more making for a slightly keener drive, but falling a bit short of the GTS in the power stakes. The Cayman T will be introduced as a 2019 model year car, although deliveries falling quite late into the year with the first likely to hit the UK roads in early summer. Sitting just above the 718 S but below the GTS, the Cayman T will come with a sports exhaust system, and 20-inch alloy wheels. It will also get 20 mm closer to the ground. The Sport Chrono Package is expected to be offered as standard which includes Porsche Active Driveline Mounts and launch control. The manual gearbox optioned models will come equipped with a rev-matching function. The Cayman T is expected to include the following specification - PSE - 20 inch wheels - 20 mm lower ride height - Sports Chrono Pack with Porsche Active Driveline Mounts - Launch Control - Rev Matching function (Manual) - Infotainment Delete - Lightweight Glass - Fabric Door Pulls - Lightweight Seats
  4. Well the rumours are becoming more beefed up in regard to the possibility of the Cayman T arriving and following in the footsteps of it's larger brother, the Carrera T. It could also go someway towards bringing back some of what Porsche gave us with the 987 Cayman R and have never really delivered on again either with the 981 or 718, the GTS being a bit soft and the GT4 being a bit, well GT. Our favorite mid-engined coupe from Stuttgart will be going under the knife and and our sources suggest that the Cayman T will be losing c. 30kg over the standard 718 and gaining 10-20hp more making for a slightly keener drive, but falling a bit short of the GTS in the power stakes. The Cayman T will be introduced as a 2019 model year car, although deliveries falling quite late into the year with the first likely to hit the UK roads in early summer. Sitting just above the 718 S but below the GTS, the Cayman T will come with a sports exhaust system, and 20-inch alloy wheels. It will also get 20 mm closer to the ground. The Sport Chrono Package is expected to be offered as standard which includes Porsche Active Driveline Mounts and launch control. The manual gearbox optioned models will come equipped with a rev-matching function. The Cayman T is expected to include the following specification - PSE - 20 inch wheels - 20 mm lower ride height - Sports Chrono Pack with Porsche Active Driveline Mounts - Launch Control - Rev Matching function (Manual) - Infotainment Delete - Lightweight Glass - Fabric Door Pulls - Lightweight Seats View full record
  5. The next-gen GT4 has been spotted testing at Monza in CS guise. As we reported earlier in the year, the 2019 car will get a 4.0-litre borrowed from the 911 GT3 which is expected to deliver in excess of 400hp. The road going version's spec is still yet to be unveiled...PDK, Manual, PDK AND Manual....watch this space. For now, enjoy the video! View full record
  6. The next-gen GT4 has been spotted testing at Monza in CS guise. As we reported earlier in the year, the 2019 car will get a 4.0-litre borrowed from the 911 GT3 which is expected to deliver in excess of 400hp. The road going version's spec is still yet to be unveiled...PDK, Manual, PDK AND Manual....watch this space. For now, enjoy the video!
  7. Rumours are mounting regarding a Cayman GT4 rally car. Stuttgart is currently working on a rally derivative of the the GT4 based on the previous gen car. The company’s motorsport arm posted on Twitter the other day a series of images of a rally car study based on the current Cayman GT Clubsport. The car will serve as a course car later this month during the Rallye Deutschland and is going to be driven by Romain Dumas, none other than the new record holder at Pikes Peak with the I.D. R electric rally car. Porsche has not been forth coming with details of the drive train and other interesting bits, but has said it will decide on a production version later this year. The car appears to be based on a 981 GT4 Clubsport, but with extra modifications customary to a rally car such as the light pod on the bonnet, a roof air intake, and a very flat underside presumably for both protection and aerodynamics. We await news and will be watching to see how this develops. It will be the first time Porsche has entered a factory car into a rally event since the very early 1980s. View full record
  8. Rumours are mounting regarding a Cayman GT4 rally car. Stuttgart is currently working on a rally derivative of the the GT4 based on the previous gen car. The company’s motorsport arm posted on Twitter the other day a series of images of a rally car study based on the current Cayman GT Clubsport. The car will serve as a course car later this month during the Rallye Deutschland and is going to be driven by Romain Dumas, none other than the new record holder at Pikes Peak with the I.D. R electric rally car. Porsche has not been forth coming with details of the drive train and other interesting bits, but has said it will decide on a production version later this year. The car appears to be based on a 981 GT4 Clubsport, but with extra modifications customary to a rally car such as the light pod on the bonnet, a roof air intake, and a very flat underside presumably for both protection and aerodynamics. We await news and will be watching to see how this develops. It will be the first time Porsche has entered a factory car into a rally event since the very early 1980s.
  9. Porsche has announced its 600-hp Tesla opponent will be called the Taycan. This Friday Porsche introduced the official name of its new electric GT car that will take on Tesla's Model S marking 70 years of Porsche sports cars. Taycan, roughly translated as "lively young horse," references the imagery at the heart of the Porsche crest, which features a leaping horse. "Our new electric sports car is strong and dependable; it's a vehicle that can consistently cover long distances and that epitomizes freedom," Porsche chief Oliver Blume said in a statement. The car is expected to be open for orders in early 2019, with deliveries being taken later that year. Powered by two synchronous motors generating more than 600 hp, the Taycan can do 0 to 100 kph (62 mph) in less than 3.5 seconds. The vehicle has a driving range of more than 500 km (310 miles) on a single charge under NEDC testing. We will be keeping a very close eye on this car and welcome potential new Taycan owners here at CaymanOC. Forget flat-4 shinnanigans, here's the future people, is it bright...? Meanwhile, enjoy this official trailer from Porsche. Doc. View full record
  10. Porsche has announced its 600-hp Tesla opponent will be called the Taycan. This Friday Porsche introduced the official name of its new electric GT car that will take on Tesla's Model S marking 70 years of Porsche sports cars. Taycan, roughly translated as "lively young horse," references the imagery at the heart of the Porsche crest, which features a leaping horse. "Our new electric sports car is strong and dependable; it's a vehicle that can consistently cover long distances and that epitomizes freedom," Porsche chief Oliver Blume said in a statement. The car is expected to be open for orders in early 2019, with deliveries being taken later that year. Powered by two synchronous motors generating more than 600 hp, the Taycan can do 0 to 100 kph (62 mph) in less than 3.5 seconds. The vehicle has a driving range of more than 500 km (310 miles) on a single charge under NEDC testing. We will be keeping a very close eye on this car and welcome potential new Taycan owners here at CaymanOC. Forget flat-4 shinnanigans, here's the future people, is it bright...? Meanwhile, enjoy this official trailer from Porsche. Doc.
  11. The Doc

    Apex-hunting.jpg

    great photo!!
  12. So the debate will always continue, but as Catchpole rightly points out in this video by Carfection, Porsche have listened to their discerning customers have have recently re-introduced the manual box on it's GT3. Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT program, recently commented that the GT3 “is full of systems that make sense on the track, but for the purist, there may be something lost”. He also added “it is our long-term goal to have the customer decide between the two approaches”. Most interestingly though is the 911.2 GT3 is actually a 6 speed box rather than the 7 speed manual found in other Carrera models. It will be interesting to see what approach Porsche take with the upcoming 718 GT4 model in this regard. Enjoy Doc. View full record
  13. The Doc

    Manuals Matter

    So the debate will always continue, but as Catchpole rightly points out in this video by Carfection, Porsche have listened to their discerning customers have have recently re-introduced the manual box on it's GT3. Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT program, recently commented that the GT3 “is full of systems that make sense on the track, but for the purist, there may be something lost”. He also added “it is our long-term goal to have the customer decide between the two approaches”. Most interestingly though is the 911.2 GT3 is actually a 6 speed box rather than the 7 speed manual found in other Carrera models. It will be interesting to see what approach Porsche take with the upcoming 718 GT4 model in this regard. Enjoy Doc.
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