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The Doc

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  1. There will be many eyes rolling at the title I'm sure and much has been written on many an internet forum on the topic of N-rated tyres. But I'm not here to enter the murky depths of whether an N-rated tyre has a different rubber compound to it's non-rated equivalent, nor am I going to make any claims as to the performance differences and whether by not using N-rated tyres you will find yourself in a ditch one day. Today, I'm focussing on something more specific, and answering the question "Do insurance companies require you to fit N-rated tyres on your Porsche?" We spoke to a number of UK car insurance companies on this matter, some were less informed on the topic and some had obviously heard the question before, but the answer from all of those we questioned was the same - No, there is no requirement within our policy conditions that you fit N-rated tyres to your Porsche. The result of our conversations with the insurance companies and reading the small print on policies provided to Porsche owners, it was clear that the requirement to fit OE approved tyres as replacement to satisfy insurance policy conditions is certainly not common, in fact we couldn't find an insurer that did require it. There are however requirements to ensure that the correct tyre size and speed ratings are maintained, although this is still not that common to see it's certainly something that would be recommended for wider safety and performance of your car. That said, if a car insurer does require you to use OEM parts as a policy condition, firstly this doesn't usually refer to tyres, and if it did it is very unusual, even in the context of ultra high performance cars, such as a 918 for instance. But if it is there, you should check exactly what that means with the insurer before taking out the policy, because strictly speaking OEM refers to using the same brand of replacement parts. If your car insurance company insists on you using OE approved tyres as part of your policy conditions, then this is not such a grey area and would suggest that you should be fitting N-rated tyres to your car to ensure you are satisfying the conditions of your policy. However, we are not aware of any instance of this being the case, certainly not in the UK.
  2. I suppose it's no surprise that like many a petrolhead, spending time cruising the classifieds is not a strange habit. It could be likened in fact to a lady window shopping in her local designer outlet village and coming home with nothing but a receipt from Pret a Manger. When you spend that much time hanging out in the classifieds and coupled with a bit of talk among those in the trade you start to gauge a picture. So understanding the dynamics of used Porsche prices at the current time is not hard, but it does require some clear thinking and a bit of honesty if you are to judge the right price for a potential purchase. Just like me, you will probably also see a variety of posts on social media from folk wondering why their pride and joy hasn't sold even when advertised at 'below market price' and acting quite bewildered by this situation. Often this belief is supported and upheld by their fraternity, reaction is often a cocktail of denial and head scratching. But were somebody to suggest that said advertised car might be priced a bit punchy, you will literally be marched to Tyburn for suggesting such an outrageous idea. There is truth though, and it's cold and it's hard. The recent announcement of the 718 GT4 is not news, we all knew it was coming and sure enough it's nearly arrived. The good news is, it's faster, it's manual, it's got a flat-six naturally aspirated engine and it will be better than the 981 GT4. All very obvious when you say it out loud. The RRP is also £75k, add a few options and yes, it's likely to be just over £80k. What does this mean for the 981 GT4, the car thats market value went ridiculously through the roof, to the point that people were paying well over £100k for 'the best specced versions' back in 2016. Many of these cars are now fetching sub-£80k and falling still. We are now increasingly seeing 981 GT4s on the market for less than £70k and auction prices looking a fair bit lower, in fact bid prices are often not reaching the perceived market price. So what I hear you say.. Well, we've established that you can buy a very low mileage (sub 15k miles) 981 GT4 with a good spec for around £68k. Theres one or two in the classifieds and more to be had at auction. This represents sensible money for a 981 GT4, but there's probably a little more to go before the year is out, we'll see low £60k i'm sure. This invariably has a knock on affect and on to a car that I hold dear, one which i've always said is a better car in many ways than its bigger brother GT4, the Cayman R. Legendary for its simplistic and purist driver focussed approach, no frills but useable, limited but not exclusive. Porsche nailed it with this car, and we all know it. So the Cayman R was a bargain at £45k at a time when a used 981 GT4 was £100k+, 80% of the car for 50% of the cost, what's not to like. We were literally snapping them up all day long, they were selling over the phone at reputable dealerships provided they were endowed with those 3 most critical items - bucket seats, manual gearbox and spyder wheels. Any other options were nice, but certainly not required to deliver that legendary Cayman R experience. A Cayman R with those key options and a decent history should be fetching in the early £40k bracket, slightly down on 2016 prices but not by much. If however you are sitting on a car wit no bucket seats, PDK and above average mileage then you probably won't see north of £35k as a private sale in 2019. Now thats a bitter pill to swallow because back in 2016 even these cars were fetching mid-£40k at dealers amid the frenzy. There is currently a less-desirably specced (PDK, no buckets, higher than average miles) black Cayman R on eBay for £35,995 and has been hanging around for a while, it's unfortunately specced and still isn't selling at this price even though it apparently has OPC warranty and FPSH. The market has certainly toughened. So there it is, current pricing of some of the halo Cayman models are taking a bit of a hit brought on by the arrival of the new kid in town and maybe some nervousness more generally in the premium segment of the market. Hagerty have been reporting a decline in auction bid prices for Porsches for a while and the bubble that we've all been talking about is showing signs of deflating further. All this and I haven't even mentioned Brexit. What does this mean for a potential buyer of either of these models though, well the world is your oyster. A Cayman R for c.£35k is possible or even a low mileage 981 GT4 for mid £60s - a good time to buy compared to 18 months ago, or should you stay resolute and hold out a bit longer to see where the market goes...
  3. Well the rumours are becoming more beefed up in regard to the possibility of the Cayman T arriving and following in the footsteps of it's larger brother, the Carrera T. It could also go someway towards bringing back some of what Porsche gave us with the 987 Cayman R and have never really delivered on again either with the 981 or 718, the GTS being a bit soft and the GT4 being a bit, well GT. Our favorite mid-engined coupe from Stuttgart will be going under the knife and and our sources suggest that the Cayman T will be losing c. 30kg over the standard 718 and gaining 10-20hp more making for a slightly keener drive, but falling a bit short of the GTS in the power stakes. The Cayman T will be introduced as a 2019 model year car, although deliveries falling quite late into the year with the first likely to hit the UK roads in early summer. Sitting just above the 718 S but below the GTS, the Cayman T will come with a sports exhaust system, and 20-inch alloy wheels. It will also get 20 mm closer to the ground. The Sport Chrono Package is expected to be offered as standard which includes Porsche Active Driveline Mounts and launch control. The manual gearbox optioned models will come equipped with a rev-matching function. The Cayman T is expected to include the following specification - PSE - 20 inch wheels - 20 mm lower ride height - Sports Chrono Pack with Porsche Active Driveline Mounts - Launch Control - Rev Matching function (Manual) - Infotainment Delete - Lightweight Glass - Fabric Door Pulls - Lightweight Seats
  4. Well the rumours are becoming more beefed up in regard to the possibility of the Cayman T arriving and following in the footsteps of it's larger brother, the Carrera T. It could also go someway towards bringing back some of what Porsche gave us with the 987 Cayman R and have never really delivered on again either with the 981 or 718, the GTS being a bit soft and the GT4 being a bit, well GT. Our favorite mid-engined coupe from Stuttgart will be going under the knife and and our sources suggest that the Cayman T will be losing c. 30kg over the standard 718 and gaining 10-20hp more making for a slightly keener drive, but falling a bit short of the GTS in the power stakes. The Cayman T will be introduced as a 2019 model year car, although deliveries falling quite late into the year with the first likely to hit the UK roads in early summer. Sitting just above the 718 S but below the GTS, the Cayman T will come with a sports exhaust system, and 20-inch alloy wheels. It will also get 20 mm closer to the ground. The Sport Chrono Package is expected to be offered as standard which includes Porsche Active Driveline Mounts and launch control. The manual gearbox optioned models will come equipped with a rev-matching function. The Cayman T is expected to include the following specification - PSE - 20 inch wheels - 20 mm lower ride height - Sports Chrono Pack with Porsche Active Driveline Mounts - Launch Control - Rev Matching function (Manual) - Infotainment Delete - Lightweight Glass - Fabric Door Pulls - Lightweight Seats View full record
  5. The next-gen GT4 has been spotted testing at Monza in CS guise. As we reported earlier in the year, the 2019 car will get a 4.0-litre borrowed from the 911 GT3 which is expected to deliver in excess of 400hp. The road going version's spec is still yet to be unveiled...PDK, Manual, PDK AND Manual....watch this space. For now, enjoy the video! View full record
  6. The next-gen GT4 has been spotted testing at Monza in CS guise. As we reported earlier in the year, the 2019 car will get a 4.0-litre borrowed from the 911 GT3 which is expected to deliver in excess of 400hp. The road going version's spec is still yet to be unveiled...PDK, Manual, PDK AND Manual....watch this space. For now, enjoy the video!
  7. Rumours are mounting regarding a Cayman GT4 rally car. Stuttgart is currently working on a rally derivative of the the GT4 based on the previous gen car. The company’s motorsport arm posted on Twitter the other day a series of images of a rally car study based on the current Cayman GT Clubsport. The car will serve as a course car later this month during the Rallye Deutschland and is going to be driven by Romain Dumas, none other than the new record holder at Pikes Peak with the I.D. R electric rally car. Porsche has not been forth coming with details of the drive train and other interesting bits, but has said it will decide on a production version later this year. The car appears to be based on a 981 GT4 Clubsport, but with extra modifications customary to a rally car such as the light pod on the bonnet, a roof air intake, and a very flat underside presumably for both protection and aerodynamics. We await news and will be watching to see how this develops. It will be the first time Porsche has entered a factory car into a rally event since the very early 1980s. View full record
  8. Rumours are mounting regarding a Cayman GT4 rally car. Stuttgart is currently working on a rally derivative of the the GT4 based on the previous gen car. The company’s motorsport arm posted on Twitter the other day a series of images of a rally car study based on the current Cayman GT Clubsport. The car will serve as a course car later this month during the Rallye Deutschland and is going to be driven by Romain Dumas, none other than the new record holder at Pikes Peak with the I.D. R electric rally car. Porsche has not been forth coming with details of the drive train and other interesting bits, but has said it will decide on a production version later this year. The car appears to be based on a 981 GT4 Clubsport, but with extra modifications customary to a rally car such as the light pod on the bonnet, a roof air intake, and a very flat underside presumably for both protection and aerodynamics. We await news and will be watching to see how this develops. It will be the first time Porsche has entered a factory car into a rally event since the very early 1980s.
  9. Porsche has announced its 600-hp Tesla opponent will be called the Taycan. This Friday Porsche introduced the official name of its new electric GT car that will take on Tesla's Model S marking 70 years of Porsche sports cars. Taycan, roughly translated as "lively young horse," references the imagery at the heart of the Porsche crest, which features a leaping horse. "Our new electric sports car is strong and dependable; it's a vehicle that can consistently cover long distances and that epitomizes freedom," Porsche chief Oliver Blume said in a statement. The car is expected to be open for orders in early 2019, with deliveries being taken later that year. Powered by two synchronous motors generating more than 600 hp, the Taycan can do 0 to 100 kph (62 mph) in less than 3.5 seconds. The vehicle has a driving range of more than 500 km (310 miles) on a single charge under NEDC testing. We will be keeping a very close eye on this car and welcome potential new Taycan owners here at CaymanOC. Forget flat-4 shinnanigans, here's the future people, is it bright...? Meanwhile, enjoy this official trailer from Porsche. Doc. View full record
  10. Porsche has announced its 600-hp Tesla opponent will be called the Taycan. This Friday Porsche introduced the official name of its new electric GT car that will take on Tesla's Model S marking 70 years of Porsche sports cars. Taycan, roughly translated as "lively young horse," references the imagery at the heart of the Porsche crest, which features a leaping horse. "Our new electric sports car is strong and dependable; it's a vehicle that can consistently cover long distances and that epitomizes freedom," Porsche chief Oliver Blume said in a statement. The car is expected to be open for orders in early 2019, with deliveries being taken later that year. Powered by two synchronous motors generating more than 600 hp, the Taycan can do 0 to 100 kph (62 mph) in less than 3.5 seconds. The vehicle has a driving range of more than 500 km (310 miles) on a single charge under NEDC testing. We will be keeping a very close eye on this car and welcome potential new Taycan owners here at CaymanOC. Forget flat-4 shinnanigans, here's the future people, is it bright...? Meanwhile, enjoy this official trailer from Porsche. Doc.
  11. The Doc

    Apex-hunting.jpg

    great photo!!
  12. So the debate will always continue, but as Catchpole rightly points out in this video by Carfection, Porsche have listened to their discerning customers have have recently re-introduced the manual box on it's GT3. Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT program, recently commented that the GT3 “is full of systems that make sense on the track, but for the purist, there may be something lost”. He also added “it is our long-term goal to have the customer decide between the two approaches”. Most interestingly though is the 911.2 GT3 is actually a 6 speed box rather than the 7 speed manual found in other Carrera models. It will be interesting to see what approach Porsche take with the upcoming 718 GT4 model in this regard. Enjoy Doc. View full record
  13. The Doc

    Manuals Matter

    So the debate will always continue, but as Catchpole rightly points out in this video by Carfection, Porsche have listened to their discerning customers have have recently re-introduced the manual box on it's GT3. Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT program, recently commented that the GT3 “is full of systems that make sense on the track, but for the purist, there may be something lost”. He also added “it is our long-term goal to have the customer decide between the two approaches”. Most interestingly though is the 911.2 GT3 is actually a 6 speed box rather than the 7 speed manual found in other Carrera models. It will be interesting to see what approach Porsche take with the upcoming 718 GT4 model in this regard. Enjoy Doc.
  14. From the land of the rising sun has emerged a 987 Cayman like no other. It is often phrase head in Cayman circles "what if Porsche put the GT3 engine in a 987". Well, now its been done, and this time in a package which appears so thoroughly executed. Allow me to introduce M’s Machine Work's Cayman GT3. The car is the work of Takayuki Mizumoto, a Japanese motorsport engineer. Mizumoto-san is the proprietor of M’s Machine Works, an outfit that designs, builds and manufactures bespoke components for the Super GT race series, a race series for road-going cars made famous for being incredibly fast. This latest project car from Mizumoto-san however is not a race entry, it's a road legal track toy - for pleasure!! Taking a closer look at the spec of this hooligan Cayman the obvious place to begin is the engine, which in fairness needs very little introduction. The Mezger derived lump is from a 997 GT3 Cup car providing c. 450bhp. OK, so it has been done before, we know Jurgen Alzen Motorsports entered a similar set-up in the GT4 series, but they were not road legal...and they didn't look this good! The transplanted engine is kept alive using a Motec ECU and the engine is mated to a manual 6 speed transmission with a custom LSD. One hopes with some form of adjustment to the final drive. Cosmetic surgery has been performed quite extensively making the resemblance from a base 987 quite distant. The front end has been reconfigured with 997 GT3 facelift but with a few custom teaks and downforce enhancing upgrades including a carbon fibre splitter, oversized dive planes and a more aerodynamic flatter floor. Mizumoto-san has increased the track by some noticeable margin on the car, the result is a car requiring some rather extreme wide arches. The rear of the car is barely recognisable as a Cayman of any known species with hardly any bumper to speak of, a rear wing that quite honestly is super-massive and a rear diffuser spanning nearly the whole width of the car. This an extreme make-over, but one which has genuine performance enhancements at the core of its design. The interior of the car has not escaped the motorsport inspired treatment either, a race spec steering wheel, fully fitted roll cage, air jack, poly windows and a whole other heap of goodies adorning the stripped out cabin again point to this being a seriously specced racer. Finishing touches include the lightweight Volk wheels, super sticky Advan tyres and plenty of vinyl die-cuts plastered across the car. This is certainly an impressive machine and track times posted by Mizumoto-san are even more so. With a 100kg weight saving over a GT4 and plenty more power you'd hope so though. There are rumours of a MkII car which will feature a GT2 engine instead of the naturally aspirated GT3 motor, we await news... View full record
  15. From the land of the rising sun has emerged a 987 Cayman like no other. It is often phrase head in Cayman circles "what if Porsche put the GT3 engine in a 987". Well, now its been done, and this time in a package which appears so thoroughly executed. Allow me to introduce M’s Machine Work's Cayman GT3. The car is the work of Takayuki Mizumoto, a Japanese motorsport engineer. Mizumoto-san is the proprietor of M’s Machine Works, an outfit that designs, builds and manufactures bespoke components for the Super GT race series, a race series for road-going cars made famous for being incredibly fast. This latest project car from Mizumoto-san however is not a race entry, it's a road legal track toy - for pleasure!! Taking a closer look at the spec of this hooligan Cayman the obvious place to begin is the engine, which in fairness needs very little introduction. The Mezger derived lump is from a 997 GT3 Cup car providing c. 450bhp. OK, so it has been done before, we know Jurgen Alzen Motorsports entered a similar set-up in the GT4 series, but they were not road legal...and they didn't look this good! The transplanted engine is kept alive using a Motec ECU and the engine is mated to a manual 6 speed transmission with a custom LSD. One hopes with some form of adjustment to the final drive. Cosmetic surgery has been performed quite extensively making the resemblance from a base 987 quite distant. The front end has been reconfigured with 997 GT3 facelift but with a few custom teaks and downforce enhancing upgrades including a carbon fibre splitter, oversized dive planes and a more aerodynamic flatter floor. Mizumoto-san has increased the track by some noticeable margin on the car, the result is a car requiring some rather extreme wide arches. The rear of the car is barely recognisable as a Cayman of any known species with hardly any bumper to speak of, a rear wing that quite honestly is super-massive and a rear diffuser spanning nearly the whole width of the car. This an extreme make-over, but one which has genuine performance enhancements at the core of its design. The interior of the car has not escaped the motorsport inspired treatment either, a race spec steering wheel, fully fitted roll cage, air jack, poly windows and a whole other heap of goodies adorning the stripped out cabin again point to this being a seriously specced racer. Finishing touches include the lightweight Volk wheels, super sticky Advan tyres and plenty of vinyl die-cuts plastered across the car. This is certainly an impressive machine and track times posted by Mizumoto-san are even more so. With a 100kg weight saving over a GT4 and plenty more power you'd hope so though. There are rumours of a MkII car which will feature a GT2 engine instead of the naturally aspirated GT3 motor, we await news...
  16. A member started a thread on the forum this week entitled ‘what’s in your garage’, and it got us thinking, the garage, man-cave, ‘office’, call it what you will it’s the pride of many a petrol head’s home. In fact some examples that can be found around the web are indeed enough to make you realise that even your bedroom is more than due for a lick of paint, because some people are taking better care of their cars than you are of yourself and your family it seems. Many of you have probably seen ’12 Gauge Garage’, the pride and joy clearly of one man and his classic 911 – it’s worth a look because this particular garage has its very own website. Jack Olsen’s Garage You delve a bit deeper into this micro universe of garages and you begin to realise that this is more than just a passion for some folk, We’d almost put some owners up there with the likes of Howard Hughes. Eating your dinner from the bench is standard, some appear to be of a level of cleanliness that has far surpassed that, it would without a doubt put the NHS to shame; although open heart surgery is tricky with a 13mm ratchet, we’ve been told.. The garages (or garage rooms as some should be) that really impressed us are those which have an element of architectural interest about them or with some imaginative design aspect. This particular garage is a marvel to behold, enjoy… TR Built Garage We would prefer to see some more members garages personally, if it contains your pride and joy Cayman or a selection of fine vintage and classic Stuttgart metal then that it goes without saying it will be more than welcome here, but we’re equally intrigued to see what else graces your should-be car space, washing machine and ride-on lawn mowers included. Show us how original you can be here: Whats in your garage thread Famous US TV chat show hosts need not apply.
  17. A member started a thread on the forum this week entitled ‘what’s in your garage’, and it got us thinking, the garage, man-cave, ‘office’, call it what you will it’s the pride of many a petrol head’s home. In fact some examples that can be found around the web are indeed enough to make you realise that even your bedroom is more than due for a lick of paint, because some people are taking better care of their cars than you are of yourself and your family it seems. Many of you have probably seen ’12 Gauge Garage’, the pride and joy clearly of one man and his classic 911 – it’s worth a look because this particular garage has its very own website. Jack Olsen’s Garage You delve a bit deeper into this micro universe of garages and you begin to realise that this is more than just a passion for some folk, We’d almost put some owners up there with the likes of Howard Hughes. Eating your dinner from the bench is standard, some appear to be of a level of cleanliness that has far surpassed that, it would without a doubt put the NHS to shame; although open heart surgery is tricky with a 13mm ratchet, we’ve been told.. The garages (or garage rooms as some should be) that really impressed us are those which have an element of architectural interest about them or with some imaginative design aspect. This particular garage is a marvel to behold, enjoy… TR Built Garage We would prefer to see some more members garages personally, if it contains your pride and joy Cayman or a selection of fine vintage and classic Stuttgart metal then that it goes without saying it will be more than welcome here, but we’re equally intrigued to see what else graces your should-be car space, washing machine and ride-on lawn mowers included. Show us how original you can be here: Whats in your garage thread Famous US TV chat show hosts need not apply. View full record
  18. For those of you that don’t know allow me to introduce Magnus Walker and if you don’t know the man chances are you’ve seen his ’71 911T no.277 which has graced the covers of several Porsche magazines over the last few years. Like the R-Gruppe founder Cris Huergas before him Magnus is a marmite man… If you love early 911’s then you’ll either love or hate what he does. Either way his passion for Porsche and particularly his love for the 911 is plain to see but before we get into the cars let’s talk about the man. “Porsche collection – Out of control hobby” is where it begins (sounds familiar) and a forum thread posted on the “bird” gives us an insight into his collection of SWB 911’s from 64 to 72, it’s a great read, all 152 pages! “Out of Control Hobby” “Outlaw” is a fitting phrase he’s coined for his collection but what makes these cars special, what sets them apart is the single minded vision of their owner. By his own admission he’s “not your regular Porsche guy”. The first thing you notice is his beard and dreadlocks tucked up in a cap or oversized beany, The layered plaid shirts over jeans and boots is total rock’n’roll and the sparkle in his eyes when he talks about his cars is that of a man living the dream and sharing his passion. Born in Sheffield he went to the states in ’86 and ended up in LA forming his fashion label Serious Clothing in ’94, setting up shop in the Arts District of LA, the rest as they say is history. His goal is to have a 911 for every year of production between ’64 & ’73, he currently has ’64, ’65, ’66, ’68, ’69, ’70, ’71 & ’72 and each one is unique. Magnus has built what he would call “street-able, track-able, hot-rod cars” and there is no denying it, all his Outlaws are fabulous cars created from period shells and a pursuit of perfection that isn’t comparable to the regular “factory stock” approach. But let us be clear these are not “backdated” 3.0 SC’s or Carrera 3.2’s these are authentic period 911’s. Although they’re not “matching numbers cars” each one is tuned, beautifully finished and crafted by Magnus. The attention to detail is inspiring, the gradual addition of elements to give each car a unique personality and character is what sets them apart but most importantly these aren’t museum pieces, these cars are driven. Of course that’s not the whole story… Now Magnus is suffering from a condition that some of us have experienced Turbo fever. Now we all know that there is only one medicine to reduce the burning all-consuming desire… But Magnus has taken it to the next level and has 4! Three from ’76 & one from ’77 all 3 litre non inter-cooled cars, one of which was the first registered Turbo Carrera in the USA. As you would imagine these cars are also stunning and some have signature ‘Magnus Walker 911’ elements, rather than ramble on I’ll let him explain in his own words… “G.O.A.D” is an acronym we’re going to adopt at CaymanOC if you haven’t guessed what it means yet then Magnus can enlighten you, it’s simple; “Get out and drive” Author: Elliot Price (TF6) 2015
  19. For those of you that don’t know allow me to introduce Magnus Walker and if you don’t know the man chances are you’ve seen his ’71 911T no.277 which has graced the covers of several Porsche magazines over the last few years. Like the R-Gruppe founder Cris Huergas before him Magnus is a marmite man… If you love early 911’s then you’ll either love or hate what he does. Either way his passion for Porsche and particularly his love for the 911 is plain to see but before we get into the cars let’s talk about the man. “Porsche collection – Out of control hobby” is where it begins (sounds familiar) and a forum thread posted on the “bird” gives us an insight into his collection of SWB 911’s from 64 to 72, it’s a great read, all 152 pages! “Out of Control Hobby” “Outlaw” is a fitting phrase he’s coined for his collection but what makes these cars special, what sets them apart is the single minded vision of their owner. By his own admission he’s “not your regular Porsche guy”. The first thing you notice is his beard and dreadlocks tucked up in a cap or oversized beany, The layered plaid shirts over jeans and boots is total rock’n’roll and the sparkle in his eyes when he talks about his cars is that of a man living the dream and sharing his passion. Born in Sheffield he went to the states in ’86 and ended up in LA forming his fashion label Serious Clothing in ’94, setting up shop in the Arts District of LA, the rest as they say is history. His goal is to have a 911 for every year of production between ’64 & ’73, he currently has ’64, ’65, ’66, ’68, ’69, ’70, ’71 & ’72 and each one is unique. Magnus has built what he would call “street-able, track-able, hot-rod cars” and there is no denying it, all his Outlaws are fabulous cars created from period shells and a pursuit of perfection that isn’t comparable to the regular “factory stock” approach. But let us be clear these are not “backdated” 3.0 SC’s or Carrera 3.2’s these are authentic period 911’s. Although they’re not “matching numbers cars” each one is tuned, beautifully finished and crafted by Magnus. The attention to detail is inspiring, the gradual addition of elements to give each car a unique personality and character is what sets them apart but most importantly these aren’t museum pieces, these cars are driven. Of course that’s not the whole story… Now Magnus is suffering from a condition that some of us have experienced Turbo fever. Now we all know that there is only one medicine to reduce the burning all-consuming desire… But Magnus has taken it to the next level and has 4! Three from ’76 & one from ’77 all 3 litre non inter-cooled cars, one of which was the first registered Turbo Carrera in the USA. As you would imagine these cars are also stunning and some have signature ‘Magnus Walker 911’ elements, rather than ramble on I’ll let him explain in his own words… “G.O.A.D” is an acronym we’re going to adopt at CaymanOC if you haven’t guessed what it means yet then Magnus can enlighten you, it’s simple; “Get out and drive” Author: Elliot Price (TF6) 2015 View full record
  20. With the wealth of knowledge on internet forums these days one would think that given the number of times we hear the phrase ‘Mezger’ (often twinned with ‘bullet proof‘) we ought to have some vague knowledge of the history of this terminology used to describe the engine used in various GT and Turbo 911 derivatives. Of course we know the name, but who is Hans Mezger, and probably more importantly why is his name so synonymous with these Porsche engines? Born in November 1929 in Besigheim, Swabia, and after narrowly missing being called up to fight in the dying days of Germany’s war effort Mezger went on to graduate from Stuttgart Technical University with an engineering degree. Upon graduating Mezger had a number of opportunities to work with various large automotive companies however the first stepping stone on his chosen employment path was for a then rather small company known as Porsche which was to be his employer for the next nearly 40 years. After a few years with Porsche he moved into the design department and worked on the 804 flat-8 Formula 1 engine. This led eventually to his most notable works on the 917, here Mezger led Porsche’s development of turbocharging with the 1100 hp 917/30. Mezger’s involvement with the 917 in 1968 was to be a definitive moment in his career as 2 years later in 1970 Porsche won their first victory at Le Mans and various other endurance events that same year. Porsche were the team to beat, and indeed Ferrari desperate to compete and develop an engine worthy of doing so had sold half of their stock to Fiat to finance it. So Mezger, having developed the flat-four from the 356 into the flat six for the 901 and 911 back in 1963 an engine he managed to develop from 1.4 to 3.6 liters then found himself back in Formula 1. Ron Dennis, a director of McLaren Racing International, approached Porsche to design a Grand Prix engine which would replace the DFV in his John Barnard designed cars. Two months later on October 12th design work for the new McLaren power plant was handed over to Hans Merger, now Porsche’s deputy head of engine research and development. Mezger was responsible for the TAG V6 engine which dominated Formula One in the late ’80s nestled in the middle of the McLaren F1 cars and went on to be responsible for 3 consecutive drivers championships. So what of the ‘Mezger Engine’, where did it really begin. Many refer to the original being developed for the Porsche 911 GT1 car, but this wasn’t unveiled until 1996 and we know that Mezger retired from Porsche in 1994, so the roots surely are further back and looking at the GT1 power plant we know it was a creation of the alloy casings derived from the 930 turbo and the 962/4 partly water cooled motor that was then coupled with a full dry sump. So a more fitting description for Mezger’s touch in the later GT and Turbo cars must go back a long way and then taking in aspects of the early 901/911 engines and elements of the TAG F1 engines derived from the Porsche Group-C cars. Confusing isn’t it? This year Mezger celebrates his 89th birthday and apparently still retains close relations with his former employer. Hans Mezger was responsible for many great creations and motorsport achievements during his career with Porsche. His name is synonymous with some of the greatest engines in Porsches history including the 911 GT/Turbo engines which have become colloquially known by his very name whether slightly misleading of their immediate heritage or otherwise. For a more in-depth look into the life and career of Hans Mezger we would recommend reading the autobiographical title ‘Porsche and Me: Hans Mezger’ by Peter Morgan. For now he earns a place in our Porsche Heroes Hall of Fame.
  21. With the wealth of knowledge on internet forums these days one would think that given the number of times we hear the phrase ‘Mezger’ (often twinned with ‘bullet proof‘) we ought to have some vague knowledge of the history of this terminology used to describe the engine used in various GT and Turbo 911 derivatives. Of course we know the name, but who is Hans Mezger, and probably more importantly why is his name so synonymous with these Porsche engines? Born in November 1929 in Besigheim, Swabia, and after narrowly missing being called up to fight in the dying days of Germany’s war effort Mezger went on to graduate from Stuttgart Technical University with an engineering degree. Upon graduating Mezger had a number of opportunities to work with various large automotive companies however the first stepping stone on his chosen employment path was for a then rather small company known as Porsche which was to be his employer for the next nearly 40 years. After a few years with Porsche he moved into the design department and worked on the 804 flat-8 Formula 1 engine. This led eventually to his most notable works on the 917, here Mezger led Porsche’s development of turbocharging with the 1100 hp 917/30. Mezger’s involvement with the 917 in 1968 was to be a definitive moment in his career as 2 years later in 1970 Porsche won their first victory at Le Mans and various other endurance events that same year. Porsche were the team to beat, and indeed Ferrari desperate to compete and develop an engine worthy of doing so had sold half of their stock to Fiat to finance it. So Mezger, having developed the flat-four from the 356 into the flat six for the 901 and 911 back in 1963 an engine he managed to develop from 1.4 to 3.6 liters then found himself back in Formula 1. Ron Dennis, a director of McLaren Racing International, approached Porsche to design a Grand Prix engine which would replace the DFV in his John Barnard designed cars. Two months later on October 12th design work for the new McLaren power plant was handed over to Hans Merger, now Porsche’s deputy head of engine research and development. Mezger was responsible for the TAG V6 engine which dominated Formula One in the late ’80s nestled in the middle of the McLaren F1 cars and went on to be responsible for 3 consecutive drivers championships. So what of the ‘Mezger Engine’, where did it really begin. Many refer to the original being developed for the Porsche 911 GT1 car, but this wasn’t unveiled until 1996 and we know that Mezger retired from Porsche in 1994, so the roots surely are further back and looking at the GT1 power plant we know it was a creation of the alloy casings derived from the 930 turbo and the 962/4 partly water cooled motor that was then coupled with a full dry sump. So a more fitting description for Mezger’s touch in the later GT and Turbo cars must go back a long way and then taking in aspects of the early 901/911 engines and elements of the TAG F1 engines derived from the Porsche Group-C cars. Confusing isn’t it? This year Mezger celebrates his 89th birthday and apparently still retains close relations with his former employer. Hans Mezger was responsible for many great creations and motorsport achievements during his career with Porsche. His name is synonymous with some of the greatest engines in Porsches history including the 911 GT/Turbo engines which have become colloquially known by his very name whether slightly misleading of their immediate heritage or otherwise. For a more in-depth look into the life and career of Hans Mezger we would recommend reading the autobiographical title ‘Porsche and Me: Hans Mezger’ by Peter Morgan. For now he earns a place in our Porsche Heroes Hall of Fame. View full record
  22. This is supposed to be a regular piece about Motoring Icons who would have hopefully at least a tenuous link somewhere in history with Porsche. However unless you keep a keen eye on the latest Nurburgring lap times or are a Porsche fan, you’ve probably not heard much of this chap and so household name he isn’t. But in the Porsche world he is very well known, the question is why and where’s he come from….who is Walter Röhrl? Walter Röhrl was born on 7th March 1947 in Regensburg, Germany, growing up he was an accomplished skier and became a ski instructor. His CV would probably say something like “German rally and auto racing driver, with victories for Fiat, Opel, Lancia and Audi as well as Porsche, Ford and BMW. Currently senior test driver for Porsche road cars”. Röhrl made his name in rally driving during the golden era of the Group B rally cars which required skill, guts and a steely nerve at the very least, real men’s rallying. But it wasn’t just taking part in this hairy chested ordeal that made him famous, it was winning the first rally he entered in 1968 at the age of 21. From there he went on to many successful titles, numerous podium finishes and won the WRC twice. That would in itself be a successful career for many, but not for Röhrl. In 1987 Röhrl entered the Pikes Peak hill climb in Colorado, his tool was an Audi Sport Quattro S1 endowed with over 600 horsepower. Back then the road which is now mainly covered in tarmac was a treacherous gravel track which snaked its way around 156 corners to a height of over 14,000ft. Röhrl finished there that day, smashing the record by 22 seconds and the first to break the 11 minute mark. Röhrl was also successful in road racing events, and has won many plaudits including being elected Rallye Driver of the Century in Italy, Rallye driver of the Millennium in France, and quite blushingly referred to once as a “Genius on Wheels” by Niki Lauda. So what of his work for Porsche, so far he’s been connected with many other manufactures with a racing heritage, and whilst having occasionally raced in Porsches over the years it wasn’t until more recently that his name has really been synonymous with Porsche. His position as senior test driver requires amongst other jobs, to set fast lap times in new Porsche cars round the Nürburgring Nordschleife (do jobs get any better than that?). Doing this since the early 1990s and having been involved in the development of many of the more exciting models that Porsche produce. In July 2004 Röhrl set the then lap record for a production car at the Nürburgring in a Porsche Carrera GT, the very car that more recently Röhrl described publicly as the first car he has driven that he is scared of, following the untimely death of the actor Paul Walker. There is so much more that can be written on Röhrl’s career to date, numerous achievements in fact, from 4 wins at Monte Carlo to being the youngest person to win the WRC in 1980. I could go on, but I’d suggest that a more animated view of the master at work is a short YouTube search away. In the meantime we certainly have no hesitation in welcoming Walter Röhrl into our hall of fame, one of his less prestigious titles we accept but one of huge appreciation. View full record
  23. This is supposed to be a regular piece about Motoring Icons who would have hopefully at least a tenuous link somewhere in history with Porsche. However unless you keep a keen eye on the latest Nurburgring lap times or are a Porsche fan, you’ve probably not heard much of this chap and so household name he isn’t. But in the Porsche world he is very well known, the question is why and where’s he come from….who is Walter Röhrl? Walter Röhrl was born on 7th March 1947 in Regensburg, Germany, growing up he was an accomplished skier and became a ski instructor. His CV would probably say something like “German rally and auto racing driver, with victories for Fiat, Opel, Lancia and Audi as well as Porsche, Ford and BMW. Currently senior test driver for Porsche road cars”. Röhrl made his name in rally driving during the golden era of the Group B rally cars which required skill, guts and a steely nerve at the very least, real men’s rallying. But it wasn’t just taking part in this hairy chested ordeal that made him famous, it was winning the first rally he entered in 1968 at the age of 21. From there he went on to many successful titles, numerous podium finishes and won the WRC twice. That would in itself be a successful career for many, but not for Röhrl. In 1987 Röhrl entered the Pikes Peak hill climb in Colorado, his tool was an Audi Sport Quattro S1 endowed with over 600 horsepower. Back then the road which is now mainly covered in tarmac was a treacherous gravel track which snaked its way around 156 corners to a height of over 14,000ft. Röhrl finished there that day, smashing the record by 22 seconds and the first to break the 11 minute mark. Röhrl was also successful in road racing events, and has won many plaudits including being elected Rallye Driver of the Century in Italy, Rallye driver of the Millennium in France, and quite blushingly referred to once as a “Genius on Wheels” by Niki Lauda. So what of his work for Porsche, so far he’s been connected with many other manufactures with a racing heritage, and whilst having occasionally raced in Porsches over the years it wasn’t until more recently that his name has really been synonymous with Porsche. His position as senior test driver requires amongst other jobs, to set fast lap times in new Porsche cars round the Nürburgring Nordschleife (do jobs get any better than that?). Doing this since the early 1990s and having been involved in the development of many of the more exciting models that Porsche produce. In July 2004 Röhrl set the then lap record for a production car at the Nürburgring in a Porsche Carrera GT, the very car that more recently Röhrl described publicly as the first car he has driven that he is scared of, following the untimely death of the actor Paul Walker. There is so much more that can be written on Röhrl’s career to date, numerous achievements in fact, from 4 wins at Monte Carlo to being the youngest person to win the WRC in 1980. I could go on, but I’d suggest that a more animated view of the master at work is a short YouTube search away. In the meantime we certainly have no hesitation in welcoming Walter Röhrl into our hall of fame, one of his less prestigious titles we accept but one of huge appreciation.
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