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Cayman Advise


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Hi All

Im considering a Cayman toward the end of the year and have a budget of £20-£25k.

I always said I’d buy myself a full fat 911 in 997 form for my 50th but think they are out of reach price wise and the Cayman represents better value to me.

I think the car for me would be a 987.2 2.9 engined car with a manual gearbox.

I’ve always maintained my own cars and the Porsche would be no different, it would only be used on weekends and do possibly a maximum of 3000 miles a year.

Maybe this would devalue it but I think this one would be a keeper for the foreseeable.

Can they be run for reasonable money?

I can afford to run one but am not the type that likes to spend thousands on a car once purchased.

I understand consumables like brakes and tyres will cost but if driven sensibly these should last a good few years.

Any ownership advice would be much appreciated.

 

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I’d say yes, especially if you do your own maintenance.

 

Buy from a reputable vendor or  get a PPI and reduce your risk.

 

Good hunting.

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Could someone clarify for me which years are the ones to avoid for possible bore score issues, I understand this issue is blown out of proportion but it’s nice to know.

 

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Some parts are unavoidably expensive. I would say from experience that doing most of the work yourself, these cars cost about the same to run as something like a 3 series BMW paying someone else to do all the work. I went from a number of 3 series BMWs to a 986 years ago and that was my experience. To take one example, you;ve got two radiators on these cars, both of which are more expensive and harder to get at than the single rad in the 3 series.

 

I'd also say if you are worried about resale value, pay a specialist to change the oil and stamp the book. The official interval is only two years / 20k miles, so it will cost basically nothing but preserve the 'full service history' for those who car and thus the value of the car. Then do everything else yourself. An absolute no brainer, if you ask me.

 

Re bore scoring the issue is not remotely blown out of proportion. It's very widespread on certain engines. But on a 2.9, it is not an issue, so nothing to worry about. For Caymans, it's only a worry on the early gen 1 3.4 from 2005 to 2009 (there are also some 3.4 gen 2 cars starting in 2009, these have a completely different engine that does not score, so a 2009 car can be either gen 1 or gen2, there are some fairly obvious styling differences).

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Posted (edited)

I see the car as a long term one so keeping service history going isn't really too much of an issue.

Oil changes for me on a garage queen will be once a year anyway.

Edited by Izzy427
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For the sake of £150-200 every two years, still think it makes sense to get the stamps in the book some people care about. Very low cost insurance should you unexpectedly want to sell.

 

I've made this mistake myself in the past, doing it all DIY expecting to never sell. Would have been better to get the basic service stamps and then do the rest myself. Almost no impact on overall ownership cost but makes for a much easier sale.

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..Or find one where the owner has meticulously maintained it themselves over a number of years (and can demonstrate it through their knowledge and receipts etc)..but the absence of stamps in the book means you get it cheaper than one thats had the full stamp treatment to start with?

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Tickle my toes the stamps. All they show is you're a mug. Buy Porsche, do your own work, and enjoy Porsche. Best way!  you really appreciate the drive and become so in tune with the vehicle. You'll love it! 😍

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Do any of you guys see yourself moving on from your car or are you very happy with it?

I've had a 911 itch to scratch for 20 years now and have a budget of £25k, I probably see this as my forever car tbh.

I considered a full fat 911 997 at one stage but think it's a bit ott for my needs and well over budget now.

I'm an ex Tvr Chimaera owner that does miss the event that it was but needs to move on!

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2 hours ago, Izzy427 said:

Do any of you guys see yourself moving on from your car or are you very happy with it?

I've had a 911 itch to scratch for 20 years now and have a budget of £25k, I probably see this as my forever car tbh.

I considered a full fat 911 997 at one stage but think it's a bit ott for my needs and well over budget now.

I'm an ex Tvr Chimaera owner that does miss the event that it was but needs to move on!

 

I don't think a 997 gen 1 would be out of budget for you (though a gen 2 likely would be):
https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202205185822191

 

There are a few at or under that price on AT and plenty of 996s.

 

911 vs Cayman running costs will be similar, you just need to watch out for bore scoring on gen 1 997s (and 987 Ss) but a good PPI should be able to identify that.

 

I would probably suggest going for a 911 if you already have that itch :)

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2 hours ago, wtaite01 said:

 

I don't think a 997 gen 1 would be out of budget for you (though a gen 2 likely would be):
https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202205185822191

 

There are a few at or under that price on AT and plenty of 996s.

 

911 vs Cayman running costs will be similar, you just need to watch out for bore scoring on gen 1 997s (and 987 Ss) but a good PPI should be able to identify that.

 

I would probably suggest going for a 911 if you already have that itch :)

Lovely car but I don’t think I’d be brave enough to take the risk on a Gen 1 unless it had the engine rebuild done already.

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48 minutes ago, Izzy427 said:

Lovely car but I don’t think I’d be brave enough to take the risk on a Gen 1 unless it had the engine rebuild done already.

 

soup of the day

gen 1 with full engine rebuild in 2015 by Porsche specialists and subsequent inspection by well respected Porsche Specialists, Zuffenhaus

 

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202207117662087

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18 hours ago, Julian987 said:

 

soup of the day

gen 1 with full engine rebuild in 2015 by Porsche specialists and subsequent inspection by well respected Porsche Specialists, Zuffenhaus

 

https://www.autotrader.co.uk/car-details/202207117662087

 

Zuffenhaus get my personal thumbs up! They're a really good indie. Would be good to understand exactly what got done, were all the liners replaced or just the scored ones? (assuming it was scoring that was the issue).

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I'm led to believe most just replace the scored ones but impossible to say without enquiring.

I personally wouldn't buy one that had not had the full engine done but that's just my preference.

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Rightly or wrongly Hartech appeared to have cornered the market in engine rebuild credibility..I'm not saying that anybody else that knows what they are doing rebuilds them any better or worse

 

The issue seems to be that if you are attempting to sell a Porsche with a rebuilt engine and the potential catastrophic cost if it hasnt been done properly a lot of folk simply wont take a punt now unless its got Hartech on the label on the tin

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A lot of people would just want it done as cheaply as possible with intentions to sell once it’s done is my guess.

what’s a Hartech full rebuild on one of these cost anyway, around £10k?

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