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Brake caliper nipple seizure


Hunter

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I feel your pain. I have been afflicted by this complaint many times over the years.

 

In just replaced all eight bleeders on mine last week, with a great deal of "ginger carefulling". When I bled the brakes prepping for Silverstone in August and noticed a couple were very tight so I wanted to address it before disaster stuck.

 

I once snapped a bleeder off in the pits at Spa... on someone else's car.. less said the better.

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I bleed the brakes and change the oil and filter in between the two year services myself.  Just because you need the stamps to maintain value and you expect it to be done properly, doesn't necessarily mean going that extra mile isn't worth it.

 

When I bleed the brakes, I remove each nipple and clean it up.  Never had an issue with any corrosion myself, but there has been a significant amount of effort to keep moving the fittings.

 

The inner nipple never being used is unforgivable.  There's no worthwhile excuse to justify it... How much was the bill for all of this, if I may?  I'm intrigued.

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29 minutes ago, Aaron said:

I bleed the brakes and change the oil and filter in between the two year services myself.  Just because you need the stamps to maintain value and you expect it to be done properly, doesn't necessarily mean going that extra mile isn't worth it.

 

When I bleed the brakes, I remove each nipple and clean it up.  Never had an issue with any corrosion myself, but there has been a significant amount of effort to keep moving the fittings.

 

The inner nipple never being used is unforgivable.  There's no worthwhile excuse to justify it... How much was the bill for all of this, if I may?  I'm intrigued.

 

Seems super sensible. I was on the fence about tackling the fluid change myself, would've tried if I didn't need the pipes doing. Is it particularly difficult?

 

The "label" price was around £1700-2000 - unclear because I think the machinist did more than he was actually paid for.

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1 hour ago, Hunter said:

 

Seems super sensible. I was on the fence about tackling the fluid change myself, would've tried if I didn't need the pipes doing. Is it particularly difficult?

 

The "label" price was around £1700-2000 - unclear because I think the machinist did more than he was actually paid for.

 

Bleeding is pretty easy.  I use a vacuum pump and clear hose:

 

Attach vacuum pump to nipple

Crack open nipple

Pull vacuum until fluid is clear

Close nipple whilst holding vacuum

Rinse and repeat for all 4 corners

Drive car, activate ABS a few times

Repeat above

 

If you have access to Durametric or PIWIS, you can activate the ABS pump to bleed instead.

 

Looking back at your picture, your caliper doesn't look in great shape in itself.  Have they really lost that much of their colour and finish around the nipple?

 

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9 hours ago, Aaron said:

 

Bleeding is pretty easy.  I use a vacuum pump and clear hose:

 

Attach vacuum pump to nipple

Crack open nipple

Pull vacuum until fluid is clear

Close nipple whilst holding vacuum

Rinse and repeat for all 4 corners

Drive car, activate ABS a few times

Repeat above

 

If you have access to Durametric or PIWIS, you can activate the ABS pump to bleed instead.

 

Looking back at your picture, your caliper doesn't look in great shape in itself.  Have they really lost that much of their colour and finish around the nipple?

 

 

 

Sadly no Durametric/PIWIS, but that does sound fairly straightforward (with a little equipment).

 

The caliper is generally okay. A few little chips in the paint here and there (most of the rear is just dusty), but yes a fair bit of corrosion around the nipples. Any DIY suggestions on fixing them up? Can't bear another bill right now.

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I can personally attest to the fact that some Official Porsche Centres only bleed through one nipple too. 

 

I wonder how many people religiously stick to OPC servicing in the mistaken belief they are getting the gold standard?

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  • 4 weeks later...

I recently had a similar scenario!! ... & another reason why I do ALL my own servicing/repairs!!

 

I fitted SS braided lines & as eluded to the caliper to flexi hose unions all seized (I posted about this previously)

 

I had to make new hardlines myself from Kunifer but I always use Silicone grease on the threads/fittings to inhibit galvanic corrosion...

Edited by Mavrik
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54 minutes ago, Mavrik said:

I recently had a similar scenario!! ... & another reason why I do ALL my own servicing/repairs!!

 

I fitted SS braided lines & as eluded to the caliper to flexi hose unions all seized (I posted about this previously)

 

I had to make new hardlines myself from Kunifer but I always use Silicone grease on the threads/fittings to inhibit galvanic corrosion...

 

Now that is a good tip on using silicon grease on fittings @Mavrik, never thought about this, just in time for rebuild of my last two callipers, bit too late for my two offside callipers Dam ! This looks like a good excuse for getting me out of decorating spare bedroom as we all know it’s more important to spend as much time as possible in a cold damp garage during winter doing blokes stuff 🤭

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Yeah, Silicone grease (or dielectric grease) is a good corrosion inhibitor & helps with this common issue of galvanic corrosion... I've used it for donkeys!

 

I also ride Superbikes & I use ACF50 corrosion inhibitor & every year when I service my CS I jet wash the arches & suspension components etc & douse with a generous coating... It was originally developed for the aerospace industry 😉

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease

 

http://www.acf-50.co.uk/

Edited by Mavrik
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3 hours ago, Mavrik said:

Yeah, Silicone grease (or dielectric grease) is a good corrosion inhibitor & helps with this common issue of galvanic corrosion... I've used it for donkeys!

 

I also ride Superbikes & I use ACF50 corrosion inhibitor & every year when I service my CS I jet wash the arches & suspension components etc & douse with a generous coating... It was originally developed for the aerospace industry 😉

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_grease

 

http://www.acf-50.co.uk/

That corrosion block inhibitor looks as though it was made for the front crossover pipework!

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Why I do as much work on my Cayman as I can.

 

Putting a Porsche mechanic on a timer can be dangerous...these cars throw up 'issues' and some take time to work through.

Edited by Andyoz
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