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Two buck method is a complete and utter waste of time


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My process

1.Auto Finesse Avalance Snow Foam on dry car
Jet wash off.
Rinse Foam Lance
Fill up with...

2. ....Auto Finesse Lavish via Lance. Allow to sit for only a minute (this aids lubrication/glide for step 3
Jet wash off
Rinse Foam Lance
Fill up with...

3. ...Auto Finesse Caramics Shampoo via Lance, applying to a panel area at a time. If it spreads, makes no odds.
Use a lambs wool mitt per panel and flip the mitt mid way. If needed rinse/blast the wool mitt under the jetwash...just don't hold hand too close to the nozzle!
Put the used lambs wool mitt in a bag.

Repeat step 3 with a new lambs wool mitt for each panel area. for my Cayman R I find the need for 6 wash mitts (12 sides). So repeat a dozen times in my case, rinse/blast it off occasionally and accordingly to how dirty each panel is, no need to dunk.

Auto Finesse Caramics Shampoo foams nice. Not like a snow foam, but more concentrated in the lance, less water wasted, and applies as much suds as dipping my hand in a bucket would achieve. Not adding more shampoo each time with each panel, just the same amount as I would apply to a bucket anyway.

Rinse Foam Lance
Fill up with...

4. ....Auto Finesse Lavish via Lance. Allow to sit for a few minutes.
Jet wash off

5. Dry what hasn't beaded off with microfibre towels, normal process here.

So what is the point of a bucket?!? let alone two!!!

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  • Founder

Holy cow.... 

 

There’s a lot of tosh in the detailing world, believe me I unearthed all sorts of dodgy goings on, but one thing that that’s not BS is keeping your mitt as clean as possible to minimise marring, and that means copious rinsing.  The two bucket method isn’t totally necessary but I would definitely use one bucket with a grit guard.  You won’t see whether your mitt is clean, or free of the very small pieces of grit, but you’ll notice after months and years.  
 

Another tip, don’t keep a pure lambs wool mitt in a plastic bag, it’ll rot as it’s natural fibre.  Dry it and store it after it’s dry.  
 

👍🏻   

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Blimey Julian, @Julian987, thats a lot of work but clearly you must find it worthwhile. I do use the two bucket method, snow foam and lance for the final shampoo etc and thought this was bordering on excessive but I am really impressed as to the lengths you go to. 

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My routine is:


internal clean  using starnagloss (thanks @Beanoir™ 👍🏻) interior cleaner and hoover (leather gets a conditioning 2-3 times a year), then:

 

1) jet wash rinse whole car to shift general surface muck (if lots of road grime and bug splats will precede this with APC ‘mist’ spray all over bonnet, nose, rear, sides)

 

2) bilt hammer APC wheels & tyres & dwell for 2-3 minutes each

3) jet rinse wheels

4) valet pro bilberry wheel cleaner & dwell for 2-3 mins each

5) jet rinse wheels

6) bucket wash wheels (using (wheels only) micro fibre mitt & valetpro soft nylon bristle wheel nuts brush

7) jet rinse wheels

 

8) jet rinse car surfaces

9) snow foam car (incl wheels) (using bilt hammer currently)

10) jet rinse car

11) 2 bucket wash of car using clean deep pile micro fibre mitt (carpro reset shampoo)

13) jet rinse car

14) mist spray CarPro hydro2 lite sealant

14) jet rinse car

 

15) large micro fibre towels wipe car own from top to bottom

16) smaller micro fibre cloths to dry nooks & crannies (ie doors, trunk & frunk shuts)

17) dry wheels (separate micro fibre)

18) clean (with starnagloss, thanks again @Beanoir™ 👍🏻), dry and polish glass

 

19) gloss tyres

 

20) refresh black plastics & rubbers as necessary (probably 2-3 times a year)

 

21) drive slowly round estate with gentle left-foot braking to allow water to disperse out of brakes

 

22) final micro fibre dry off any drips and apply starnagloss (thanks again @Beanoir™ 😉) quick detail spray to any areas needing some extra gloss

 

23) park in garage, step back, smugly admire gleaming porker chariot, congratulate self for 1) being so lucky to own such a coveted car and 2) being a master of DIY detailing... 😉👍🏻😆

 

Twice a year I finish the clean off with CarPro reload to top up the ceramic’s hydrophobic properties.  

 

Edited by Windymiller
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2 hours ago, Beanoir™ said:

Holy cow.... 

 

There’s a lot of tosh in the detailing world, believe me I unearthed all sorts of dodgy goings on, but one thing that that’s not BS is keeping your mitt as clean as possible to minimise marring, and that means copious rinsing.  The two bucket method isn’t totally necessary but I would definitely use one bucket with a grit guard.  You won’t see whether your mitt is clean, or free of the very small pieces of grit, but you’ll notice after months and years.  
 

Another tip, don’t keep a pure lambs wool mitt in a plastic bag, it’ll rot as it’s natural fibre.  Dry it and store it after it’s dry.  
 

👍🏻   

 

:)  Your kind reply has made me think that there is no harm in a bucket for rinsing, thinking about it, rather than blasting off with the jet, dunking into a bucket with grit guard would be wise. I'll do that! but still, thats one bucket, I still don't see the need for two! :)

 

I only put them in a bag whilst washing the car for somewhere for them to go...and then wash them and dry them left hung up to dry 

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2 hours ago, elucius said:

Blimey Julian, @Julian987, thats a lot of work but clearly you must find it worthwhile. I do use the two bucket method, snow foam and lance for the final shampoo etc and thought this was bordering on excessive but I am really impressed as to the lengths you go to. 

 

Thanks for your reply. That you have the lance, do try the shampoo in the lance, I think you'll find the amount of suds and control you'll have will start to make you think why two buckets. 

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1 hour ago, Windymiller said:

My routine is:


internal clean  using starnagloss (thanks @Beanoir™ 👍🏻) interior cleaner and hoover (leather gets a conditioning 2-3 times a year), then:

 

1) jet wash rinse whole car to shift general surface muck (if lots of road grime and bug splats will precede this with APC ‘mist’ spray all over bonnet, nose, rear, sides)

 

2) bilt hammer APC wheels & tyres & dwell for 2-3 minutes each

3) jet rinse wheels

4) valet pro bilberry wheel cleaner & dwell for 2-3 mins each

5) jet rinse wheels

6) bucket wash wheels (using (wheels only) micro fibre mitt & valetpro soft nylon bristle wheel nuts brush

7) jet rinse wheels

 

8) jet rinse car surfaces

9) snow foam car (incl wheels) (using bilt hammer currently)

10) jet rinse car

11) 2 bucket wash of car using clean deep pile micro fibre mitt (carpro reset shampoo)

13) jet rinse car

14) mist spray CarPro hydro2 lite sealant

14) jet rinse car

 

15) large micro fibre towels wipe car own from top to bottom

16) smaller micro fibre cloths to dry nooks & crannies (ie doors, trunk & frunk shuts)

17) dry wheels (separate micro fibre)

18) clean (with starnagloss, thanks again @Beanoir™ 👍🏻), dry and polish glass

 

19) gloss tyres

 

20) refresh black plastics & rubbers as necessary (probably 2-3 times a year)

 

21) drive slowly round estate with gentle left-foot braking to allow water to disperse out of brakes

 

22) final micro fibre dry off any drips and apply starnagloss (thanks again @Beanoir™ 😉) quick detail spray to any areas needing some extra gloss

 

23) park in garage, step back, smugly admire gleaming porker chariot, congratulate self for 1) being so lucky to own such a coveted car and 2) being a master of DIY detailing... 😉👍🏻😆

 

Twice a year I finish the clean off with CarPro reload to top up the ceramic’s hydrophobic properties.  

 

 

That is epic! On the wheels I follow a similar process before the snow foam.

For your step 14, rather than spray mist it, you could consider Auto Finesse Lavish Ceramic Foam ...no I dont work for them :) as probably easier to apply and get full coverage than the spray mist. 

My step 28 differs as its a black car... so I step back, admire it, yet realise it now needs a wash again!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Founder

All this talk of car washing makes me want to get out and do mine.  
 

I’ve actually started to use snow foam less, I find some of the citrus pre-washes do a better job of removing the dirt.  Bilt Hamber auto foam is still my go-to snow foam though, can’t find anything better still.  
 

Anybody using a water filter for the final rinse?? 


 

 

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4 hours ago, Beanoir™ said:

 

Anybody using a water filter for the final rinse?? 


 

 

 

I was just looking at them! 

They seem fantastic to me. I think I will go with this one

https://www.raceglaze.co.uk/car-care-exterior/rinsing-water-filters/car-wash-water-filter-14-litre-tall/

 

or 

https://www.raceglaze.co.uk/car-care-exterior/rinsing-water-filters/race-glaze-7L-water-filter/

 

I have also found this one, https://purefinalrinse.co.uk/product/pure-final-rinse-single-bag-vessel/

yet the website is not very clear. Tons of words but not clear.

 

Which ones have you found? and are interested in? The Raceglaze has a 2 week money back guarantee which is good. 

 

 

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The raceglaze is probably the one I’d go for, the smaller of the two.  
 

Most of my detailer clients used that one, seemed to be the professional’s choice.  
 

The beauty of them is being able to do a final rinse and then just leave the car to dry of it’s own accord and zero watermarks left.  

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I've got the Raceglaze filter. I live in a hard water area and it works well, leaving zero water marks. Just do a final rinse with it (especially the wing mirrors) and leave it. Even works in direct, warm sunshine.

 

The biggest gripe I have is that there's no comfortable way to carry it around. It's the size and weight of a fire extinguisher, but there's no handle. Just the in/out joints for the hose pipe at the top, which isn't ideal.

 

I still find myself drying the door shuts etc...

 

As for the 2 bucket method, try it once, then look at your rinsing bucket when you've finished. All that crap in there, instead of being dragged across the paintwork.

 

Cheers,

Bryan

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2 hours ago, briggy said:

I've got the Raceglaze filter. I live in a hard water area and it works well, leaving zero water marks. Just do a final rinse with it (especially the wing mirrors) and leave it. Even works in direct, warm sunshine.

 

The biggest gripe I have is that there's no comfortable way to carry it around. It's the size and weight of a fire extinguisher, but there's no handle. Just the in/out joints for the hose pipe at the top, which isn't ideal.

 

I still find myself drying the door shuts etc...

 

As for the 2 bucket method, try it once, then look at your rinsing bucket when you've finished. All that crap in there, instead of being dragged across the paintwork.

 

Cheers,

Bryan

 

i was concerned on the weight and lifting it around. Is it always 'on' as such? or does it hold that tanks worth and then refills once used up?

 

As to two buckets, yes one for dunking, I can see that, but as my above process, I apply the shampoo via the lance which suds/foams up far better and more concentrated and far more controllable than via a bucket. So why two buckets? All Youtuber detailers have lances, so why not just use the lance to lather up the car rather than dunking into a bucket to get suds. Makes no sense. And you'll see all these detailers only dunk for suds a few times, so the whole bucket of shampoo and water is just wasted. Easier to measure out in a lance too. 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, briggy said:

I've got the Raceglaze filter. I live in a hard water area and it works well, leaving zero water marks. Just do a final rinse with it (especially the wing mirrors) and leave it. Even works in direct, warm sunshine.

 

 

Can it be used ok with a pressure washer and you can really just leave it to dry with no need for towels (bar the door shuts).....in otherwords, no need to touch the car again after the final rinse. 

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For always on - you attach a hosepipe on one side from the water supply, then another hosepipe where the filtered water comes out. You don't have to fill it with water each time you use it. It continues to filter while tap water runs through it.

 

I don't know if you can attach it to a pressure washer, but I wouldn't. You really need to put the smallest amount of water through as possible i.e. just the final rinse. The more water you put through, the quicker you'll need to replace the resin, which reassuringly expensive.

 

Yes. You can just leave it to dry without towels. Zero water marks. I've only used it for 4 washes so far, but it's been 100% effective. I can't say how long it'll last though.

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  • 4 months later...
On 15/05/2021 at 22:24, briggy said:

For always on - you attach a hosepipe on one side from the water supply, then another hosepipe where the filtered water comes out. You don't have to fill it with water each time you use it. It continues to filter while tap water runs through it.

 

I don't know if you can attach it to a pressure washer, but I wouldn't. You really need to put the smallest amount of water through as possible i.e. just the final rinse. The more water you put through, the quicker you'll need to replace the resin, which reassuringly expensive and car detailing by aperfectshinedetailing.

 

Yes. You can just leave it to dry without towels. Zero water marks. I've only used it for 4 washes so far, but it's been 100% effective. I can't say how long it'll last though.

Same here with me.

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My Neighbour is a windown cleaner, so has a ready supply of filtered water that he uses to rinse down after a quick wash on his Ford Ranger. 

It's amazing, like with your windows it just drys off an not a water mark in sight!

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On 15/05/2021 at 08:34, Beanoir™ said:

Anybody using a water filter for the final rinse?? 


 

 

 

OMG yes, I have a Raceglaze 14L filter, hands down the best detailing money I ever spent. Not only does it mean you save the effort of the drying phase, but it means you're touching the paint soooooo much less and inflicting fewer defects. I tell everyone who'll listen about them but no one seems to care 🤣 they all tell me you still need to dry it off or I need it because I'm in a hard water areas (which I am not)

https://www.raceglaze.co.uk/car-care-exterior/rinsing-water-filters/car-wash-water-filter-14-litre-tall/

 

Coincidentally, I changed the filter media this weekend (£90), I reckon the last lot did 3 years and it was still not showing any signs of spotting, so I'm pretty pleased with that ROI.

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On 15/05/2021 at 16:21, Julian987 said:

 

Can it be used ok with a pressure washer and you can really just leave it to dry with no need for towels (bar the door shuts).....in otherwords, no need to touch the car again after the final rinse. 

 

I use mine for all the water that comes out the outside tap, filling the wash buckets, pressure washer, final rinse. If you want to maximise the filter media life, you could swap it over just for final rinse (which I did at first) but I gave up on that and it's still lasted me years, and I use it at least every other weekend.

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